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{"id":7689521234070,"title":"Pair of Chinese Silver Gilt Filigree Goblets - China, Mid-18th Century","handle":"pair-of-chinese-silver-gilt-filigree-goblets-china-mid-18th-century","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis stunning and very rare pair of 18th-century silver gilt goblets were fashioned from filigree silver and made functional by the addition of removable silver gilt liners, which they still retain, semi-concealed behind the filigree exterior. They were made in China around the middle of the eighteenth century and would have been destined for the European export market, most probably for France and possibly for a member of the royal household.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eOn the side of each goblet is an ogival cartouche, set within the filigree, containing a depiction of a lily flower with six petals and pronounced stamens. Some other examples of flowers or leaves within a filigree panel can be found in 'Silver Wonders from the East', including a close-up photo showing a drawer front from Catherine the Great's Toilet Mirror.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn France, prior to the revolution, the lily flower was the symbol of French royalty. A heavily stylised lily flower, known as the fleur-de-lis (flower of the lily) was adopted in the 12th century by, either King Louis VI or King Louis VII, when the monarch utilised the fleur-de-lis design on his shield so that his men could readily identify their monarch. The lily flower symbolises perfection, light and life and is also associated with Christianity. The Gospels of Mark and Luke report that Jesus said, \"Consider the lilies, how they grow: they neither toil nor spin, yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these\". In Christian art, a white lily has often been used to symbolise Madonna's purity.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eKing Louis XIV of France (1638 – 1715) adored filigree, as did his mother, who bequeathed him her own collection. During his reign, he amassed a collection of 167 gold and 693 silver filigree objects, which he displayed in three rooms at Versailles. Louis was mocked for his obsession by the Comte de Guiche, who cheekily referred to the King as the 'Marquis de Filigrane'. The filigree collections of Lous XIV, Catherine the Great of Russia, helped to popularise filigree throughout Europe and many rulers and aristocrats acquired some filigree items around this time. These were very costly objects which reflected their owner's high status. Fine filigree objects were made in China, India and Batavia and brought back to Europe by merchants, such as those of the East India Company, where they were sold for enormous profits. Later, the filigree was also manufactured in Europe.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eLouis XIV was succeeded by his great-grandson, Louis XV (1715 - 1774), who probably added to his predecessor's collection. Unfortunately, the Versailles collection did not survive the French Revolution, when objects would have been destroyed and dispersed. Saule recorded that a large proportion of Louis XIV's collection was of Chinese origin.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe bowls of the goblets are conical. They are supported by knopped stems emanating from domed feet. The solid silver gilt rim to the top has been incised with a meander border. This ancient Chinese design is known as hui-wen and symbolises rebirth. The rest of the cone is constructed of filigree with a strict repeating design which is sometimes known as the 'overlapping coin' pattern. A pair of rosewater sprinklers of similar date and panels of filigree in the same 'overlapping coin' pattern is illustrated on page 27 of 'Silver Wonders from the East'.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe filigree of the upper part, which forms the conical bowl, differs in style to the filigree forming the stems and feet, which is a more freestyle tangle of looping and arched threads, curlicues and relaxed spirals within panels delineated by thick flattened wires.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe feet of the goblets are domed, and the panels of filigree take the form of three rows of concentric petals emanating from the centre point and increasing in size as they approach the edge of the foot, which is finished by a thick double-wire border to the edge.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe large spherical knop to the centre of the stem facilitates grip and this is echoed by a similar but smaller knop at the base of the stem and another at the top of the stem, which is shaped more like a ring. The two straighter sections of the stem were constructed in panels which were joined together, then rolled to form a cylinder and joined by vertical seams.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe spherical knops were constructed of petal-shaped panels, which, once joined, became a bowl-shaped 'flower'. One forms the lower hemisphere of the knop and another, a similar 'flower' is inverted and placed over the first before joining the two halves to form the sphere. Many strikingly similar examples of these spheres can be seen in mid-18th-century silver filigree objects. Often, they became the feet of filigree boxes and baskets. A few of these boxes and a rectangular filigree basket with these feet are illustrated in 'Silver Filigree from the East'.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eSome of the distinguishing features of the mid-18th century Chinese silver filigree can be seen in these goblets:-\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe filigree has been constructed from wires of different gauges, some of which have been twisted, others flattened, with the remainder retaining their original round profile. Also, various panels worked in different filigree styles are usually found within the same object. \u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eProvenance: European Art Market\u003cbr\u003eDimensions:- Height 13.3 cms; Width 6.5 cms \u003cbr\u003eWeight:- 280 grammes \u003cbr\u003e \u003cbr\u003eReferences:- \u003cbr\u003eB Saule, Cabinet des Filigranes, Versailles (unpublished) \u003cbr\u003eMaria Menshikova et al, Silver Wonders from the East; Filigree of the Tsars, Hermitage Amsterdam, 27 April-17 September 2006. \u003cbr\u003eThe Bible\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2023-01-11T13:27:12+00:00","created_at":"2023-01-11T11:36:26+00:00","vendor":"Joseph Cohen Antiques","type":"Silver Goblet","tags":["Chinese Export Silver"],"price":1175000,"price_min":1175000,"price_max":1175000,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":42408331706518,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"JC-SILV-07116","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Pair of Chinese Silver Gilt Filigree Goblets - China, Mid-18th Century","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":1175000,"weight":280,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":"shopify","barcode":"","requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_allocations":[]}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Pair-of-Chinese-Silver-Gilt-Filigree-Goblets-China-Mid-18th-Century.jpg?v=1673442626","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Chinese-Silver-Gilt-Filigree-Goblets.jpg?v=1673442829","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Chinese-Silver-Gilt-Filigree-Goblets-China-Mid-18th-Century.jpg?v=1673442829","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Pair-of-Chinese-Silver-Gilt-Filigree-Goblets.jpg?v=1673442829","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Mid-18th-Century-Pair-of-Chinese-Silver-Gilt-Filigree-Goblets-China.jpg?v=1673442829","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Chinese-Silver-Filigree-Goblets.jpg?v=1673442843"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Pair-of-Chinese-Silver-Gilt-Filigree-Goblets-China-Mid-18th-Century.jpg?v=1673442626","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":"Pair of Chinese Silver Gilt Filigree Goblets China Mid 18th Century","id":26919982137494,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1280,"width":1280,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Pair-of-Chinese-Silver-Gilt-Filigree-Goblets-China-Mid-18th-Century.jpg?v=1673442626"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1280,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Pair-of-Chinese-Silver-Gilt-Filigree-Goblets-China-Mid-18th-Century.jpg?v=1673442626","width":1280},{"alt":"Chinese Silver Gilt Filigree Goblets","id":26919993606294,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1280,"width":1280,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Chinese-Silver-Gilt-Filigree-Goblets.jpg?v=1673442829"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1280,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Chinese-Silver-Gilt-Filigree-Goblets.jpg?v=1673442829","width":1280},{"alt":"Chinese Silver Gilt Filigree Goblets China Mid 18th Century","id":26919983218838,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1280,"width":1280,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Chinese-Silver-Gilt-Filigree-Goblets-China-Mid-18th-Century.jpg?v=1673442829"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1280,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Chinese-Silver-Gilt-Filigree-Goblets-China-Mid-18th-Century.jpg?v=1673442829","width":1280},{"alt":"Pair of Chinese Silver Gilt Filigree Goblets","id":26919984529558,"position":4,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1280,"width":1280,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Pair-of-Chinese-Silver-Gilt-Filigree-Goblets.jpg?v=1673442829"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1280,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Pair-of-Chinese-Silver-Gilt-Filigree-Goblets.jpg?v=1673442829","width":1280},{"alt":"Mid 18th Century Pair of Chinese Silver Gilt Filigree Goblets China","id":26919988002966,"position":5,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1280,"width":1280,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Mid-18th-Century-Pair-of-Chinese-Silver-Gilt-Filigree-Goblets-China.jpg?v=1673442829"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1280,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Mid-18th-Century-Pair-of-Chinese-Silver-Gilt-Filigree-Goblets-China.jpg?v=1673442829","width":1280},{"alt":"Chinese Silver Filigree Goblets","id":26919994851478,"position":6,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1280,"width":1280,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Chinese-Silver-Filigree-Goblets.jpg?v=1673442843"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1280,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Chinese-Silver-Filigree-Goblets.jpg?v=1673442843","width":1280}],"requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_groups":[],"content":"\u003cp\u003eThis stunning and very rare pair of 18th-century silver gilt goblets were fashioned from filigree silver and made functional by the addition of removable silver gilt liners, which they still retain, semi-concealed behind the filigree exterior. They were made in China around the middle of the eighteenth century and would have been destined for the European export market, most probably for France and possibly for a member of the royal household.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eOn the side of each goblet is an ogival cartouche, set within the filigree, containing a depiction of a lily flower with six petals and pronounced stamens. Some other examples of flowers or leaves within a filigree panel can be found in 'Silver Wonders from the East', including a close-up photo showing a drawer front from Catherine the Great's Toilet Mirror.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn France, prior to the revolution, the lily flower was the symbol of French royalty. A heavily stylised lily flower, known as the fleur-de-lis (flower of the lily) was adopted in the 12th century by, either King Louis VI or King Louis VII, when the monarch utilised the fleur-de-lis design on his shield so that his men could readily identify their monarch. The lily flower symbolises perfection, light and life and is also associated with Christianity. The Gospels of Mark and Luke report that Jesus said, \"Consider the lilies, how they grow: they neither toil nor spin, yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these\". In Christian art, a white lily has often been used to symbolise Madonna's purity.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eKing Louis XIV of France (1638 – 1715) adored filigree, as did his mother, who bequeathed him her own collection. During his reign, he amassed a collection of 167 gold and 693 silver filigree objects, which he displayed in three rooms at Versailles. Louis was mocked for his obsession by the Comte de Guiche, who cheekily referred to the King as the 'Marquis de Filigrane'. The filigree collections of Lous XIV, Catherine the Great of Russia, helped to popularise filigree throughout Europe and many rulers and aristocrats acquired some filigree items around this time. These were very costly objects which reflected their owner's high status. Fine filigree objects were made in China, India and Batavia and brought back to Europe by merchants, such as those of the East India Company, where they were sold for enormous profits. Later, the filigree was also manufactured in Europe.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eLouis XIV was succeeded by his great-grandson, Louis XV (1715 - 1774), who probably added to his predecessor's collection. Unfortunately, the Versailles collection did not survive the French Revolution, when objects would have been destroyed and dispersed. Saule recorded that a large proportion of Louis XIV's collection was of Chinese origin.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe bowls of the goblets are conical. They are supported by knopped stems emanating from domed feet. The solid silver gilt rim to the top has been incised with a meander border. This ancient Chinese design is known as hui-wen and symbolises rebirth. The rest of the cone is constructed of filigree with a strict repeating design which is sometimes known as the 'overlapping coin' pattern. A pair of rosewater sprinklers of similar date and panels of filigree in the same 'overlapping coin' pattern is illustrated on page 27 of 'Silver Wonders from the East'.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe filigree of the upper part, which forms the conical bowl, differs in style to the filigree forming the stems and feet, which is a more freestyle tangle of looping and arched threads, curlicues and relaxed spirals within panels delineated by thick flattened wires.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe feet of the goblets are domed, and the panels of filigree take the form of three rows of concentric petals emanating from the centre point and increasing in size as they approach the edge of the foot, which is finished by a thick double-wire border to the edge.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe large spherical knop to the centre of the stem facilitates grip and this is echoed by a similar but smaller knop at the base of the stem and another at the top of the stem, which is shaped more like a ring. The two straighter sections of the stem were constructed in panels which were joined together, then rolled to form a cylinder and joined by vertical seams.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe spherical knops were constructed of petal-shaped panels, which, once joined, became a bowl-shaped 'flower'. One forms the lower hemisphere of the knop and another, a similar 'flower' is inverted and placed over the first before joining the two halves to form the sphere. Many strikingly similar examples of these spheres can be seen in mid-18th-century silver filigree objects. Often, they became the feet of filigree boxes and baskets. A few of these boxes and a rectangular filigree basket with these feet are illustrated in 'Silver Filigree from the East'.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eSome of the distinguishing features of the mid-18th century Chinese silver filigree can be seen in these goblets:-\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe filigree has been constructed from wires of different gauges, some of which have been twisted, others flattened, with the remainder retaining their original round profile. Also, various panels worked in different filigree styles are usually found within the same object. \u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eProvenance: European Art Market\u003cbr\u003eDimensions:- Height 13.3 cms; Width 6.5 cms \u003cbr\u003eWeight:- 280 grammes \u003cbr\u003e \u003cbr\u003eReferences:- \u003cbr\u003eB Saule, Cabinet des Filigranes, Versailles (unpublished) \u003cbr\u003eMaria Menshikova et al, Silver Wonders from the East; Filigree of the Tsars, Hermitage Amsterdam, 27 April-17 September 2006. \u003cbr\u003eThe Bible\u003c\/p\u003e"}

Pair of Chinese Silver Gilt Filigree Goblets - China, Mid-18th Century

Product Description

This stunning and very rare pair of 18th-century silver gilt goblets were fashioned from filigree silver and made functional by the addition of removable silver gilt liners, which they still retain, semi-concealed behind the filigree exterior. They were made in China around the middle of the eighteenth century and would have been destined for the European export market, most probably for France and possibly for a member of the royal household.

On the side of each goblet is an ogival cartouche, set within the filigree, containing a depiction of a lily flower with six petals and pronounced stamens. Some other examples of flowers or leaves within a filigree panel can be found in 'Silver Wonders from the East', including a close-up photo showing a drawer front from Catherine the Great's Toilet Mirror.

In France, prior to the revolution, the lily flower was the symbol of French royalty. A heavily stylised lily flower, known as the fleur-de-lis (flower of the lily) was adopted in the 12th century by, either King Louis VI or King Louis VII, when the monarch utilised the fleur-de-lis design on his shield so that his men could readily identify their monarch. The lily flower symbolises perfection, light and life and is also associated with Christianity. The Gospels of Mark and Luke report that Jesus said, "Consider the lilies, how they grow: they neither toil nor spin, yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these". In Christian art, a white lily has often been used to symbolise Madonna's purity.

King Louis XIV of France (1638 – 1715) adored filigree, as did his mother, who bequeathed him her own collection. During his reign, he amassed a collection of 167 gold and 693 silver filigree objects, which he displayed in three rooms at Versailles. Louis was mocked for his obsession by the Comte de Guiche, who cheekily referred to the King as the 'Marquis de Filigrane'. The filigree collections of Lous XIV, Catherine the Great of Russia, helped to popularise filigree throughout Europe and many rulers and aristocrats acquired some filigree items around this time. These were very costly objects which reflected their owner's high status. Fine filigree objects were made in China, India and Batavia and brought back to Europe by merchants, such as those of the East India Company, where they were sold for enormous profits. Later, the filigree was also manufactured in Europe.

Louis XIV was succeeded by his great-grandson, Louis XV (1715 - 1774), who probably added to his predecessor's collection. Unfortunately, the Versailles collection did not survive the French Revolution, when objects would have been destroyed and dispersed. Saule recorded that a large proportion of Louis XIV's collection was of Chinese origin.

The bowls of the goblets are conical. They are supported by knopped stems emanating from domed feet. The solid silver gilt rim to the top has been incised with a meander border. This ancient Chinese design is known as hui-wen and symbolises rebirth. The rest of the cone is constructed of filigree with a strict repeating design which is sometimes known as the 'overlapping coin' pattern. A pair of rosewater sprinklers of similar date and panels of filigree in the same 'overlapping coin' pattern is illustrated on page 27 of 'Silver Wonders from the East'.

The filigree of the upper part, which forms the conical bowl, differs in style to the filigree forming the stems and feet, which is a more freestyle tangle of looping and arched threads, curlicues and relaxed spirals within panels delineated by thick flattened wires.

The feet of the goblets are domed, and the panels of filigree take the form of three rows of concentric petals emanating from the centre point and increasing in size as they approach the edge of the foot, which is finished by a thick double-wire border to the edge.

The large spherical knop to the centre of the stem facilitates grip and this is echoed by a similar but smaller knop at the base of the stem and another at the top of the stem, which is shaped more like a ring. The two straighter sections of the stem were constructed in panels which were joined together, then rolled to form a cylinder and joined by vertical seams.

The spherical knops were constructed of petal-shaped panels, which, once joined, became a bowl-shaped 'flower'. One forms the lower hemisphere of the knop and another, a similar 'flower' is inverted and placed over the first before joining the two halves to form the sphere. Many strikingly similar examples of these spheres can be seen in mid-18th-century silver filigree objects. Often, they became the feet of filigree boxes and baskets. A few of these boxes and a rectangular filigree basket with these feet are illustrated in 'Silver Filigree from the East'.

Some of the distinguishing features of the mid-18th century Chinese silver filigree can be seen in these goblets:-

The filigree has been constructed from wires of different gauges, some of which have been twisted, others flattened, with the remainder retaining their original round profile. Also, various panels worked in different filigree styles are usually found within the same object.

Provenance: European Art Market
Dimensions:- Height 13.3 cms; Width 6.5 cms
Weight:- 280 grammes

References:-
B Saule, Cabinet des Filigranes, Versailles (unpublished)
Maria Menshikova et al, Silver Wonders from the East; Filigree of the Tsars, Hermitage Amsterdam, 27 April-17 September 2006.
The Bible

Sku: JC-SILV-07116
£11,750.00
Maximum quantity available reached.

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