FREE WORLDWIDE SHIPPING
{"id":5591386849430,"title":"Antique Batavian\/dutch Colonial Silver Spittoon (cuspidor, Kwispedoor), Batavia – Late 18th Century","handle":"antique-batavian-dutch-colonial-silver-spittoon-cuspidor-kwispedoor-batavia-late-18th-century","description":"\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eA silver spittoon of baluster form with circular foot and flaring rim, decorated with repousse floral scrolls.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eBatavian silver was made for administrators working for the Dutch East Indies Company as well as for other Europeans living in the Dutch settlement of Batavia. The work was done by a Dutch master silversmith with the assistance of Indian, Sinhalese and local craftsmen. Objects were designed in Dutch style with the oriental influence coming from the highly skilled Asian craftsmen who worked under the Dutch master silversmith.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eSpittoons such as these, were part of the paraphernalia associated with the betel nut chewing habit, popular all over Asia. A person would place a betel nut leaf containing areca nut and lime paste in his mouth and softly chew on it. Occasionally, the betel residue would be spat into a spittoon, allowing the person to continue chewing.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eBetel chewing was popular in China, South Asia, and Southeast Asia for at least 2,000 years and held an important place in social and formal etiquette.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eFor the Dutch, betel chewing quickly became a part of colonial life, with etiquette requiring that hosts offered it to their guest in most social occasions. In fact, betel chewing became so accepted that it was considered insulting not to offer it to your guests! Dutch women were especially fond of chewing betel and would be seen walking in the streets followed by a retinue of female slaves carrying betel containers, a spittoon, and other necessary accessories for betel chewing.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eThis spittoon has an Asian form, shown by its globular body and flaring rim, but European ornamentation, demonstrated by its heavy construction and the ornamentation of chased floral tendrils.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eProvenance: UK\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eWeight: 357.6 grams, Height: 11cms\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eItem: #190\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-08-09T13:45:16+01:00","created_at":"2020-08-09T13:45:15+01:00","vendor":"Joseph Cohen Antiques","type":"Spittoon","tags":["Sold Archive"],"price":0,"price_min":0,"price_max":0,"available":false,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":35684130357398,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":false,"name":"Antique Batavian\/dutch Colonial Silver Spittoon (cuspidor, Kwispedoor), Batavia – Late 18th Century","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":0,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":"shopify","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/batavian-silver-dutch-colonial-spittoon.jpg?v=1596977116","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/batavian-silver-dutch-colonial-spittoon-2.jpg?v=1596977117","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/batavian-silver-dutch-colonial-spittoon-3.jpg?v=1596977117"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/batavian-silver-dutch-colonial-spittoon.jpg?v=1596977116","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":10616704303254,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"width":768,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/batavian-silver-dutch-colonial-spittoon.jpg?v=1596977116"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/batavian-silver-dutch-colonial-spittoon.jpg?v=1596977116","width":768},{"alt":null,"id":10616704336022,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"width":768,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/batavian-silver-dutch-colonial-spittoon-2.jpg?v=1596977116"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/batavian-silver-dutch-colonial-spittoon-2.jpg?v=1596977116","width":768},{"alt":null,"id":10616704368790,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"width":768,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/batavian-silver-dutch-colonial-spittoon-3.jpg?v=1596977116"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/batavian-silver-dutch-colonial-spittoon-3.jpg?v=1596977116","width":768}],"content":"\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eA silver spittoon of baluster form with circular foot and flaring rim, decorated with repousse floral scrolls.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eBatavian silver was made for administrators working for the Dutch East Indies Company as well as for other Europeans living in the Dutch settlement of Batavia. The work was done by a Dutch master silversmith with the assistance of Indian, Sinhalese and local craftsmen. Objects were designed in Dutch style with the oriental influence coming from the highly skilled Asian craftsmen who worked under the Dutch master silversmith.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eSpittoons such as these, were part of the paraphernalia associated with the betel nut chewing habit, popular all over Asia. A person would place a betel nut leaf containing areca nut and lime paste in his mouth and softly chew on it. Occasionally, the betel residue would be spat into a spittoon, allowing the person to continue chewing.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eBetel chewing was popular in China, South Asia, and Southeast Asia for at least 2,000 years and held an important place in social and formal etiquette.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eFor the Dutch, betel chewing quickly became a part of colonial life, with etiquette requiring that hosts offered it to their guest in most social occasions. In fact, betel chewing became so accepted that it was considered insulting not to offer it to your guests! Dutch women were especially fond of chewing betel and would be seen walking in the streets followed by a retinue of female slaves carrying betel containers, a spittoon, and other necessary accessories for betel chewing.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eThis spittoon has an Asian form, shown by its globular body and flaring rim, but European ornamentation, demonstrated by its heavy construction and the ornamentation of chased floral tendrils.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eProvenance: UK\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eWeight: 357.6 grams, Height: 11cms\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eItem: #190\u003c\/p\u003e"}

Antique Batavian/dutch Colonial Silver Spittoon (cuspidor, Kwispedoor), Batavia – Late 18th Century

Product Description

A silver spittoon of baluster form with circular foot and flaring rim, decorated with repousse floral scrolls.

Batavian silver was made for administrators working for the Dutch East Indies Company as well as for other Europeans living in the Dutch settlement of Batavia. The work was done by a Dutch master silversmith with the assistance of Indian, Sinhalese and local craftsmen. Objects were designed in Dutch style with the oriental influence coming from the highly skilled Asian craftsmen who worked under the Dutch master silversmith.

Spittoons such as these, were part of the paraphernalia associated with the betel nut chewing habit, popular all over Asia. A person would place a betel nut leaf containing areca nut and lime paste in his mouth and softly chew on it. Occasionally, the betel residue would be spat into a spittoon, allowing the person to continue chewing.

Betel chewing was popular in China, South Asia, and Southeast Asia for at least 2,000 years and held an important place in social and formal etiquette.

For the Dutch, betel chewing quickly became a part of colonial life, with etiquette requiring that hosts offered it to their guest in most social occasions. In fact, betel chewing became so accepted that it was considered insulting not to offer it to your guests! Dutch women were especially fond of chewing betel and would be seen walking in the streets followed by a retinue of female slaves carrying betel containers, a spittoon, and other necessary accessories for betel chewing.

This spittoon has an Asian form, shown by its globular body and flaring rim, but European ornamentation, demonstrated by its heavy construction and the ornamentation of chased floral tendrils.

Provenance: UK

Weight: 357.6 grams, Height: 11cms

Item: #190

SOLD
Maximum quantity available reached.

Related products