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{"id":5354582212758,"title":"Antique Indian Bidri Platter\/tray, Silver Inlay, Hindu Figural Design, Rajasthan, India – 1800\/1850","handle":"antique-indian-bidri-platter-tray-silver-inlay-hindu-figural-design-rajasthan-india-1800-1850","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis charming, if slightly naïve, bidri platter or tray has been inlaid with silver using\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003ekoftgari\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eand\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003etarkashi\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003etechniques.  The design is unusual in that it depicts the natural world and has a wide border featuring a whirlwind of figures from the animal kingdom including mammals, fish, reptiles and birds. Figural designs in bidri are rare as they were extremely time consuming and difficult to execute as the craftsmen worked freehand.  The eyes on some figures appear black; this was achieved by cutting out eye holes from the silver sheet so as to reveal the black background beneath whilst the outlines of feathers, scales, folds of skin, hair, fur and harnesses have been lightly engraved. \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe ornamentation is much looser, freer flowing and without the rigid structure usually observed in bidri ware. This freedom of movement can also be seen in the inner and outer floral and foliate borders and in the fern-like\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003etarkashi\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003evegetal fronds between the figures.  Only the central geometric lotus flower, the strict division of the different areas of ornamentation and the simple running border of two undulating intersecting\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003etarkashi\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ewires to the rim, show the formal rigid and rhythmic structure usually associated with bidri wares.  Figural examples are far less common than bidri depicting geometric and floral designs and the subject matter indicates that the ornamentation of this tray follows the Hindu rather than the Muslim tradition.  The tray is believed to have been made by Hindu craftsmen of the Lingayat sect, working in the early part of the 19\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ecentury, probably in Rajasthan.  \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eGreat bronzes with copper and silver inlay were made in India as far back as the 5th and 6th centuries but according to Indian oral history, the technique of bidri inlay originated in Iran and was brought to India in the 15th century by the Bahamani ruler Ala’uddin Bahamani. Bahamani brought craftsmen from Bijapur and established them in Bidar.  The oldest examples of bidri which can be seen in museums today only date as far back as the 17th century with no earlier examples known to have survived. During the 17th and 18th centuries, Bidri objects were highly prized and produced for Indian Royalty.  Several paintings of the period depict Maharajas and courtiers at the royal courts of Deccan and Mughal India with bidri ware articles such as hookahs and boxes.  Other articles were also produced in bidri, particularly \u003cem\u003ePandans, Lotas, Surahi, Thali\u003c\/em\u003e, shields and weaponry.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eBirdri was created by Muslims and by Hindus of the Lingayat sect. The Lingayats are a sect which devolved from Hinduism, becoming separate and breaking away from mainstream Hinduism with members worshipping Shiva exclusively.  Pandey explains that ‘The Nawabs, who rose to power on the ruins of the great Mughal Empire, seem to have been especially fond of Bidri and that is how at Lucknow, in Murshidabad and Purnea, Bidri workshops sprang up from the 18th century onwards. Everywhere, however, the same six stages of the process ….. seem to have been followed equally by Muslim and Hindu craftsmen.’   He identifies the patterns deriving through the Hindu tradition which include the Swastika, lotus, human figures, birds, animals and fish.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe British public was first introduced to Bidri Wares at London’s 1851 Crystal Palace or ‘Great’ Exhibition and Markel quotes the writer and Victorian art critic, Owen Jones’, impressions of bidri hookahs \u003cem\u003e(huqqas\u003c\/em\u003e) he had seen there. Jones noted that ‘In the equal distribution of the surface ornament over the grounds, the Indians exhibit an instinct and perfection of drawing perfectly marvellous.”\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eTo read more about Bidri Wares on our blog, please follow this link  \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/www.josephcohenantiques.com\/bidri-indian-inlay\/\"\u003ehttps:\/\/www.josephcohenantiques.com\/bidri-indian-inlay\/\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eProvenance\u003c\/em\u003e:-  UK art market\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eDimensions:–\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eDiameter 35cms, Height 1cm \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eReferences:-\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eNational Museum, New Delhi, India Hookah\/Huqqa base featuring scenes from the Padamvat\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eJagdish and Kamla Mittal Museum, Hyderabad, Hookah\/Huqqa base with hunting scene and animals\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eDr Anjali Pandey, Bidri Ware:  A Unique Craft of India, Vol 4 (Issue 3), International Journal of Research Granthaalayah, March 2016\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eStephen A Markel, Bidri Ware [in LACMA]: Lyric Patterns\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMark Zebrowski, “Bidri:  Metalware from the Islamic Courts of India”, Art East, 1, 1982, pp. 27-ff\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eSusan Stronge, \u003cem\u003eBidri Ware: Inlaid Metalwork from India. \u003c\/em\u003eEdition, Victoria \u0026amp; Albert Museum, London 1985\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eOwen Jones, The Grammar of Ornament, Bernard Quaritch, London, 1868 pages 78-79\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eB N Goswamy, Metalware from the South, ‘Art and Soul, Spectrum, The Tribune, 7th August 2011\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-06-19T19:06:39+01:00","created_at":"2020-06-19T19:25:02+01:00","vendor":"Joseph Cohen Antiques","type":"Bidri Platter","tags":["Indian Regional Silver"],"price":450000,"price_min":450000,"price_max":450000,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":34803737231510,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Antique Indian Bidri Platter\/tray, Silver Inlay, Hindu Figural Design, Rajasthan, India – 1800\/1850","public_title":null,"options":["Default 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50","id":9640401404054,"position":9,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"width":768,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Antique-Indian-Bidri-Platter-Tray-Silver-Inlay-Hindu-Figural-Design-Rajasthan-India-1800-50.jpg?v=1592592342"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Antique-Indian-Bidri-Platter-Tray-Silver-Inlay-Hindu-Figural-Design-Rajasthan-India-1800-50.jpg?v=1592592342","width":768},{"alt":"Antique Indian Bidri Platter Silver Inlay Hindu Design Rajasthan India 1800-1850","id":9640404320406,"position":10,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"width":768,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Antique-Indian-Bidri-Platter-Silver-Inlay-Hindu-Design-Rajasthan-India-1800-1850.jpg?v=1592592368"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/Antique-Indian-Bidri-Platter-Silver-Inlay-Hindu-Design-Rajasthan-India-1800-1850.jpg?v=1592592368","width":768}],"content":"\u003cp\u003eThis charming, if slightly naïve, bidri platter or tray has been inlaid with silver using\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003ekoftgari\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eand\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003etarkashi\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003etechniques.  The design is unusual in that it depicts the natural world and has a wide border featuring a whirlwind of figures from the animal kingdom including mammals, fish, reptiles and birds. Figural designs in bidri are rare as they were extremely time consuming and difficult to execute as the craftsmen worked freehand.  The eyes on some figures appear black; this was achieved by cutting out eye holes from the silver sheet so as to reveal the black background beneath whilst the outlines of feathers, scales, folds of skin, hair, fur and harnesses have been lightly engraved. \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe ornamentation is much looser, freer flowing and without the rigid structure usually observed in bidri ware. This freedom of movement can also be seen in the inner and outer floral and foliate borders and in the fern-like\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003etarkashi\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003evegetal fronds between the figures.  Only the central geometric lotus flower, the strict division of the different areas of ornamentation and the simple running border of two undulating intersecting\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003etarkashi\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ewires to the rim, show the formal rigid and rhythmic structure usually associated with bidri wares.  Figural examples are far less common than bidri depicting geometric and floral designs and the subject matter indicates that the ornamentation of this tray follows the Hindu rather than the Muslim tradition.  The tray is believed to have been made by Hindu craftsmen of the Lingayat sect, working in the early part of the 19\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ecentury, probably in Rajasthan.  \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eGreat bronzes with copper and silver inlay were made in India as far back as the 5th and 6th centuries but according to Indian oral history, the technique of bidri inlay originated in Iran and was brought to India in the 15th century by the Bahamani ruler Ala’uddin Bahamani. Bahamani brought craftsmen from Bijapur and established them in Bidar.  The oldest examples of bidri which can be seen in museums today only date as far back as the 17th century with no earlier examples known to have survived. During the 17th and 18th centuries, Bidri objects were highly prized and produced for Indian Royalty.  Several paintings of the period depict Maharajas and courtiers at the royal courts of Deccan and Mughal India with bidri ware articles such as hookahs and boxes.  Other articles were also produced in bidri, particularly \u003cem\u003ePandans, Lotas, Surahi, Thali\u003c\/em\u003e, shields and weaponry.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eBirdri was created by Muslims and by Hindus of the Lingayat sect. The Lingayats are a sect which devolved from Hinduism, becoming separate and breaking away from mainstream Hinduism with members worshipping Shiva exclusively.  Pandey explains that ‘The Nawabs, who rose to power on the ruins of the great Mughal Empire, seem to have been especially fond of Bidri and that is how at Lucknow, in Murshidabad and Purnea, Bidri workshops sprang up from the 18th century onwards. Everywhere, however, the same six stages of the process ….. seem to have been followed equally by Muslim and Hindu craftsmen.’   He identifies the patterns deriving through the Hindu tradition which include the Swastika, lotus, human figures, birds, animals and fish.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe British public was first introduced to Bidri Wares at London’s 1851 Crystal Palace or ‘Great’ Exhibition and Markel quotes the writer and Victorian art critic, Owen Jones’, impressions of bidri hookahs \u003cem\u003e(huqqas\u003c\/em\u003e) he had seen there. Jones noted that ‘In the equal distribution of the surface ornament over the grounds, the Indians exhibit an instinct and perfection of drawing perfectly marvellous.”\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eTo read more about Bidri Wares on our blog, please follow this link  \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/www.josephcohenantiques.com\/bidri-indian-inlay\/\"\u003ehttps:\/\/www.josephcohenantiques.com\/bidri-indian-inlay\/\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eProvenance\u003c\/em\u003e:-  UK art market\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eDimensions:–\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eDiameter 35cms, Height 1cm \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eReferences:-\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eNational Museum, New Delhi, India Hookah\/Huqqa base featuring scenes from the Padamvat\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eJagdish and Kamla Mittal Museum, Hyderabad, Hookah\/Huqqa base with hunting scene and animals\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eDr Anjali Pandey, Bidri Ware:  A Unique Craft of India, Vol 4 (Issue 3), International Journal of Research Granthaalayah, March 2016\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eStephen A Markel, Bidri Ware [in LACMA]: Lyric Patterns\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMark Zebrowski, “Bidri:  Metalware from the Islamic Courts of India”, Art East, 1, 1982, pp. 27-ff\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eSusan Stronge, \u003cem\u003eBidri Ware: Inlaid Metalwork from India. \u003c\/em\u003eEdition, Victoria \u0026amp; Albert Museum, London 1985\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eOwen Jones, The Grammar of Ornament, Bernard Quaritch, London, 1868 pages 78-79\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eB N Goswamy, Metalware from the South, ‘Art and Soul, Spectrum, The Tribune, 7th August 2011\u003c\/p\u003e"}

Antique Indian Bidri Platter/tray, Silver Inlay, Hindu Figural Design, Rajasthan, India – 1800/1850

Product Description

This charming, if slightly naïve, bidri platter or tray has been inlaid with silver using koftgari and tarkashi techniques.  The design is unusual in that it depicts the natural world and has a wide border featuring a whirlwind of figures from the animal kingdom including mammals, fish, reptiles and birds. Figural designs in bidri are rare as they were extremely time consuming and difficult to execute as the craftsmen worked freehand.  The eyes on some figures appear black; this was achieved by cutting out eye holes from the silver sheet so as to reveal the black background beneath whilst the outlines of feathers, scales, folds of skin, hair, fur and harnesses have been lightly engraved. 

The ornamentation is much looser, freer flowing and without the rigid structure usually observed in bidri ware. This freedom of movement can also be seen in the inner and outer floral and foliate borders and in the fern-like tarkashi vegetal fronds between the figures.  Only the central geometric lotus flower, the strict division of the different areas of ornamentation and the simple running border of two undulating intersecting tarkashi wires to the rim, show the formal rigid and rhythmic structure usually associated with bidri wares.  Figural examples are far less common than bidri depicting geometric and floral designs and the subject matter indicates that the ornamentation of this tray follows the Hindu rather than the Muslim tradition.  The tray is believed to have been made by Hindu craftsmen of the Lingayat sect, working in the early part of the 19th century, probably in Rajasthan.  

Great bronzes with copper and silver inlay were made in India as far back as the 5th and 6th centuries but according to Indian oral history, the technique of bidri inlay originated in Iran and was brought to India in the 15th century by the Bahamani ruler Ala’uddin Bahamani. Bahamani brought craftsmen from Bijapur and established them in Bidar.  The oldest examples of bidri which can be seen in museums today only date as far back as the 17th century with no earlier examples known to have survived. During the 17th and 18th centuries, Bidri objects were highly prized and produced for Indian Royalty.  Several paintings of the period depict Maharajas and courtiers at the royal courts of Deccan and Mughal India with bidri ware articles such as hookahs and boxes.  Other articles were also produced in bidri, particularly Pandans, Lotas, Surahi, Thali, shields and weaponry.

Birdri was created by Muslims and by Hindus of the Lingayat sect. The Lingayats are a sect which devolved from Hinduism, becoming separate and breaking away from mainstream Hinduism with members worshipping Shiva exclusively.  Pandey explains that ‘The Nawabs, who rose to power on the ruins of the great Mughal Empire, seem to have been especially fond of Bidri and that is how at Lucknow, in Murshidabad and Purnea, Bidri workshops sprang up from the 18th century onwards. Everywhere, however, the same six stages of the process ….. seem to have been followed equally by Muslim and Hindu craftsmen.’   He identifies the patterns deriving through the Hindu tradition which include the Swastika, lotus, human figures, birds, animals and fish.

The British public was first introduced to Bidri Wares at London’s 1851 Crystal Palace or ‘Great’ Exhibition and Markel quotes the writer and Victorian art critic, Owen Jones’, impressions of bidri hookahs (huqqas) he had seen there. Jones noted that ‘In the equal distribution of the surface ornament over the grounds, the Indians exhibit an instinct and perfection of drawing perfectly marvellous.”

To read more about Bidri Wares on our blog, please follow this link  https://www.josephcohenantiques.com/bidri-indian-inlay/

Provenance:-  UK art market

Dimensions:– Diameter 35cms, Height 1cm 

References:-

National Museum, New Delhi, India Hookah/Huqqa base featuring scenes from the Padamvat

Jagdish and Kamla Mittal Museum, Hyderabad, Hookah/Huqqa base with hunting scene and animals

Dr Anjali Pandey, Bidri Ware:  A Unique Craft of India, Vol 4 (Issue 3), International Journal of Research Granthaalayah, March 2016

Stephen A Markel, Bidri Ware [in LACMA]: Lyric Patterns

Mark Zebrowski, “Bidri:  Metalware from the Islamic Courts of India”, Art East, 1, 1982, pp. 27-ff

Susan Stronge, Bidri Ware: Inlaid Metalwork from India. Edition, Victoria & Albert Museum, London 1985

Owen Jones, The Grammar of Ornament, Bernard Quaritch, London, 1868 pages 78-79

B N Goswamy, Metalware from the South, ‘Art and Soul, Spectrum, The Tribune, 7th August 2011

£4,500.00
Maximum quantity available reached.

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