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{"id":5578136027286,"title":"Antique Indian Bidri Ware Tray, Mughal India – Late 17th Century","handle":"antique-indian-bidri-ware-tray-mughal-india-late-17th-century","description":"\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eThis bidri salver is of circular form with a raised rim and profusely decorated with silver inlay.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eA rosette at the central point is surrounded by concentric bands of floral work and geometric patterns. A wide border containing threerows of carnation flowers, (with the size of the flowers increasing in each row) leads towards the rim. The raised rim with drop shaped buds.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eAccording to Indian oral history, the technique of bidri inlay originated in Iran and was brought to India in the 15th century by the Bahamani ruler Ala’uddin Bahamani. Bahamani brought craftsmen from Bijapur and established them in Bidar. However, the oldest examples of bidri which can still be seen today, only date from the 17th century.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eA salver, held within the Victoria and Albert Museum collection is of similar size, form and decoration (see ‘\u003cem\u003eBidri Ware’\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eby Susan Stronge). That salver has been attributed to 18th century Deccan.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eBidri produced after the mid-19th century is usually of inferior quality and design. Bidri objects were displayed in Indian and world exhibitions and became very popular in Europe.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eBidri ware is made from an alloy of, predominantly, zinc with small amounts of lead, copper, and tin added. The inlay was usually of silver, brass or a mix of both. Very rarely, gold was used. As seen with this tray, the lustrous silver contrasts beautifully with the matte black background.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eDuring the 17th and 18th centuries bidri objects were produced for Indian Royalty. Several paintings depict Maharahajas and courtiers at the royal courts of Deccan and Mughal India with bidri hookahs or boxes.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eDiameter: 30 cms \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eItem: #307\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-08-06T02:58:19+01:00","created_at":"2020-08-06T02:58:18+01:00","vendor":"Joseph Cohen Antiques","type":"Ware Tray","tags":["Sold Archive"],"price":0,"price_min":0,"price_max":0,"available":false,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":35628148261014,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":false,"name":"Antique Indian Bidri Ware Tray, Mughal India – Late 17th Century","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":0,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":"shopify","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/mughal-india-bidri-tray.jpg?v=1596679192","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/mughal-india-bidri-tray-2.jpg?v=1596679192","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/mughal-india-bidri-tray-3.jpg?v=1596679192"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/mughal-india-bidri-tray.jpg?v=1596679192","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":10562492268694,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"width":768,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/mughal-india-bidri-tray.jpg?v=1596679192"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/mughal-india-bidri-tray.jpg?v=1596679192","width":768},{"alt":null,"id":10562492301462,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"width":768,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/mughal-india-bidri-tray-2.jpg?v=1596679192"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/mughal-india-bidri-tray-2.jpg?v=1596679192","width":768},{"alt":null,"id":10562492334230,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"width":768,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/mughal-india-bidri-tray-3.jpg?v=1596679192"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/mughal-india-bidri-tray-3.jpg?v=1596679192","width":768}],"content":"\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eThis bidri salver is of circular form with a raised rim and profusely decorated with silver inlay.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eA rosette at the central point is surrounded by concentric bands of floral work and geometric patterns. A wide border containing threerows of carnation flowers, (with the size of the flowers increasing in each row) leads towards the rim. The raised rim with drop shaped buds.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eAccording to Indian oral history, the technique of bidri inlay originated in Iran and was brought to India in the 15th century by the Bahamani ruler Ala’uddin Bahamani. Bahamani brought craftsmen from Bijapur and established them in Bidar. However, the oldest examples of bidri which can still be seen today, only date from the 17th century.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eA salver, held within the Victoria and Albert Museum collection is of similar size, form and decoration (see ‘\u003cem\u003eBidri Ware’\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eby Susan Stronge). That salver has been attributed to 18th century Deccan.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eBidri produced after the mid-19th century is usually of inferior quality and design. Bidri objects were displayed in Indian and world exhibitions and became very popular in Europe.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eBidri ware is made from an alloy of, predominantly, zinc with small amounts of lead, copper, and tin added. The inlay was usually of silver, brass or a mix of both. Very rarely, gold was used. As seen with this tray, the lustrous silver contrasts beautifully with the matte black background.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eDuring the 17th and 18th centuries bidri objects were produced for Indian Royalty. Several paintings depict Maharahajas and courtiers at the royal courts of Deccan and Mughal India with bidri hookahs or boxes.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eDiameter: 30 cms \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eItem: #307\u003c\/p\u003e"}

Antique Indian Bidri Ware Tray, Mughal India – Late 17th Century

Product Description

This bidri salver is of circular form with a raised rim and profusely decorated with silver inlay.

A rosette at the central point is surrounded by concentric bands of floral work and geometric patterns. A wide border containing threerows of carnation flowers, (with the size of the flowers increasing in each row) leads towards the rim. The raised rim with drop shaped buds.

According to Indian oral history, the technique of bidri inlay originated in Iran and was brought to India in the 15th century by the Bahamani ruler Ala’uddin Bahamani. Bahamani brought craftsmen from Bijapur and established them in Bidar. However, the oldest examples of bidri which can still be seen today, only date from the 17th century.

A salver, held within the Victoria and Albert Museum collection is of similar size, form and decoration (see ‘Bidri Ware’ by Susan Stronge). That salver has been attributed to 18th century Deccan.

Bidri produced after the mid-19th century is usually of inferior quality and design. Bidri objects were displayed in Indian and world exhibitions and became very popular in Europe.

Bidri ware is made from an alloy of, predominantly, zinc with small amounts of lead, copper, and tin added. The inlay was usually of silver, brass or a mix of both. Very rarely, gold was used. As seen with this tray, the lustrous silver contrasts beautifully with the matte black background.

During the 17th and 18th centuries bidri objects were produced for Indian Royalty. Several paintings depict Maharahajas and courtiers at the royal courts of Deccan and Mughal India with bidri hookahs or boxes.

Diameter: 30 cms 

Item: #307

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Maximum quantity available reached.

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