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{"id":5592266473622,"title":"Antique Indian Bidriware Salver (thali), Silver And Brass Inlay, Deccan, India – 18th Century","handle":"antique-indian-bidriware-salver-thali-silver-and-brass-inlay-deccan-india-18th-century","description":"\u003cp\u003eA very fine and rare example of an 18\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ecentury, Deccani bidriware salver, expertly inlaid with silver and brass using\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003etarkashi\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e(inlaying a single wire) and\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003etebneshan\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e(inlaying elements cut from sheets of precious metals) techniques.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn general, 17th and 18th century bidriware is of more elegant and sophisticated design and required a higher degree of technical skill than bidriware produced during the 19th century.  During the 17th and 18th centuries, bidri objects were highly prized and produced for Indian Royalty.  Several paintings of the period depict Maharajas and courtiers at the royal courts of Deccan and Mughal India with bidriware articles such as hookahs and boxes. According to Markel, relying on Zebrowski, brass inlay “was confined to the Deccan and generally ceased to be inlaid after 1725”.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe central medallion is composed of four concentric circles of different elements, each defined and framed by a narrow string, or strings, of inlaid wire. At the very centre of the salver is a small circle with brass inlaid in a bold geometric design.  This is surrounded by three bands of decreasing width. First, a silver and brass inlaid elegant stylised floral and foliate design. Next, a simple repeating undulating pattern of silver and brass floral and foliate elements. The outermost and narrowest band of the medallion consists of alternating and repeating silver and brass quatrefoils.  From this point – the outer limit of the central medallion – a lozenge field emanates out and towards the rim in rows of ascending size until they reach the edge of the field, which is banded by the same repeating band of quatrefoils used at the start.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe changes in scale of the narrowing bands around the central medallion, followed by the widening bands of the emanating lozenges shows a great technical ability and dexterity and demonstrate skill and forethought in planning the design.  By playing with the perspective in this way, they have created an optical illusion; so that when the salver is viewed from above, the salver appears to be more curvaceous, rounded and bowl shaped than is actually the case. To the rim is a wide band of silver and brass palmettes, alternating in direction and interspersed with scrolling foliage. The outer edge of the salver is angled and inlaid with brass wire in a repeating chevron design, echoing the brass inlay at the central point.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMarkel quotes the writer and Victorian art critic, Owen Jones, impressions of bidri hookahs\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003e(huqqas\u003c\/em\u003e) he had seen in London’s 1851 Crystal Palace or ‘Great’ Exhibition, Jones noted that ‘In the equal distribution of the surface ornament over the grounds, the Indians exhibit an instinct and perfection of drawing perfectly marvellous.”\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis salver is in exceptional original condition for its age, exhibiting only minor losses of inlay.  It demonstrates two different inlay techniques and utilises the contrasting effects of the two different metal inlays to great effect. This salver represents all that Jones most admired about Indian design and you would be unlikely to ever find an example of bidriware which would better illustrate his comments.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eProvenance:\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e         \u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003eEuropean art market\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eSize:\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e                          Diameter:  36 cms\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eReferences:\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eStephen A Markel, Bidri Ware [in LACMA]: Lyric Patterns\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMark Zebrowski, “Bidri:  Metalware from the Islamic Courts of India”, Art East, 1, 1982, pp. 27-ff\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eSusan Stronge, 1985. \u003cem\u003eBidri Ware: Inlaid Metalwork from India. \u003c\/em\u003eEdition, Victoria \u0026amp; Albert Museum\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eOwen Jones, The Grammar of Ornament, Bernard Quaritch, London, 1868 pages 78-79\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-08-09T21:48:17+01:00","created_at":"2020-08-09T21:48:16+01:00","vendor":"Joseph Cohen Antiques","type":"Bidriware Salver","tags":["Sold Archive"],"price":0,"price_min":0,"price_max":0,"available":false,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":35688440004758,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":false,"name":"Antique Indian Bidriware Salver (thali), Silver And Brass Inlay, Deccan, India – 18th Century","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":0,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":"shopify","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/A_Bidri_Tray_DSC_5983-Editwhite.jpg?v=1597006210","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/G2Q4K_2Bidri_Tray_DSC_5985.jpg?v=1597006210","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/48Y_3Bidri_Tray_DSC_6004.jpg?v=1597006210","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/9DH_4Bidri_Tray_DSC_6005.jpg?v=1597006210","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/OCNHB_5Bidri_Tray_DSC_6012.jpg?v=1597006197"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/A_Bidri_Tray_DSC_5983-Editwhite.jpg?v=1597006210","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":10620334604438,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.071,"height":717,"width":768,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/A_Bidri_Tray_DSC_5983-Editwhite.jpg?v=1597006196"},"aspect_ratio":1.071,"height":717,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/A_Bidri_Tray_DSC_5983-Editwhite.jpg?v=1597006196","width":768},{"alt":null,"id":10620334637206,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.497,"height":513,"width":768,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/G2Q4K_2Bidri_Tray_DSC_5985.jpg?v=1597006196"},"aspect_ratio":1.497,"height":513,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/G2Q4K_2Bidri_Tray_DSC_5985.jpg?v=1597006196","width":768},{"alt":null,"id":10620334571670,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"width":768,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/48Y_3Bidri_Tray_DSC_6004.jpg?v=1597006196"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/48Y_3Bidri_Tray_DSC_6004.jpg?v=1597006196","width":768},{"alt":null,"id":10620334538902,"position":4,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"width":768,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/9DH_4Bidri_Tray_DSC_6005.jpg?v=1597006197"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/9DH_4Bidri_Tray_DSC_6005.jpg?v=1597006197","width":768},{"alt":null,"id":10620334669974,"position":5,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"width":768,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/OCNHB_5Bidri_Tray_DSC_6012.jpg?v=1597006197"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":768,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/OCNHB_5Bidri_Tray_DSC_6012.jpg?v=1597006197","width":768}],"content":"\u003cp\u003eA very fine and rare example of an 18\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ecentury, Deccani bidriware salver, expertly inlaid with silver and brass using\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003etarkashi\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e(inlaying a single wire) and\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003etebneshan\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e(inlaying elements cut from sheets of precious metals) techniques.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn general, 17th and 18th century bidriware is of more elegant and sophisticated design and required a higher degree of technical skill than bidriware produced during the 19th century.  During the 17th and 18th centuries, bidri objects were highly prized and produced for Indian Royalty.  Several paintings of the period depict Maharajas and courtiers at the royal courts of Deccan and Mughal India with bidriware articles such as hookahs and boxes. According to Markel, relying on Zebrowski, brass inlay “was confined to the Deccan and generally ceased to be inlaid after 1725”.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe central medallion is composed of four concentric circles of different elements, each defined and framed by a narrow string, or strings, of inlaid wire. At the very centre of the salver is a small circle with brass inlaid in a bold geometric design.  This is surrounded by three bands of decreasing width. First, a silver and brass inlaid elegant stylised floral and foliate design. Next, a simple repeating undulating pattern of silver and brass floral and foliate elements. The outermost and narrowest band of the medallion consists of alternating and repeating silver and brass quatrefoils.  From this point – the outer limit of the central medallion – a lozenge field emanates out and towards the rim in rows of ascending size until they reach the edge of the field, which is banded by the same repeating band of quatrefoils used at the start.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe changes in scale of the narrowing bands around the central medallion, followed by the widening bands of the emanating lozenges shows a great technical ability and dexterity and demonstrate skill and forethought in planning the design.  By playing with the perspective in this way, they have created an optical illusion; so that when the salver is viewed from above, the salver appears to be more curvaceous, rounded and bowl shaped than is actually the case. To the rim is a wide band of silver and brass palmettes, alternating in direction and interspersed with scrolling foliage. The outer edge of the salver is angled and inlaid with brass wire in a repeating chevron design, echoing the brass inlay at the central point.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMarkel quotes the writer and Victorian art critic, Owen Jones, impressions of bidri hookahs\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003e(huqqas\u003c\/em\u003e) he had seen in London’s 1851 Crystal Palace or ‘Great’ Exhibition, Jones noted that ‘In the equal distribution of the surface ornament over the grounds, the Indians exhibit an instinct and perfection of drawing perfectly marvellous.”\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis salver is in exceptional original condition for its age, exhibiting only minor losses of inlay.  It demonstrates two different inlay techniques and utilises the contrasting effects of the two different metal inlays to great effect. This salver represents all that Jones most admired about Indian design and you would be unlikely to ever find an example of bidriware which would better illustrate his comments.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eProvenance:\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e         \u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003eEuropean art market\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eSize:\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e                          Diameter:  36 cms\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eReferences:\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eStephen A Markel, Bidri Ware [in LACMA]: Lyric Patterns\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMark Zebrowski, “Bidri:  Metalware from the Islamic Courts of India”, Art East, 1, 1982, pp. 27-ff\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eSusan Stronge, 1985. \u003cem\u003eBidri Ware: Inlaid Metalwork from India. \u003c\/em\u003eEdition, Victoria \u0026amp; Albert Museum\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eOwen Jones, The Grammar of Ornament, Bernard Quaritch, London, 1868 pages 78-79\u003c\/p\u003e"}

Antique Indian Bidriware Salver (thali), Silver And Brass Inlay, Deccan, India – 18th Century

Product Description

A very fine and rare example of an 18th century, Deccani bidriware salver, expertly inlaid with silver and brass using tarkashi (inlaying a single wire) and tebneshan (inlaying elements cut from sheets of precious metals) techniques.

In general, 17th and 18th century bidriware is of more elegant and sophisticated design and required a higher degree of technical skill than bidriware produced during the 19th century.  During the 17th and 18th centuries, bidri objects were highly prized and produced for Indian Royalty.  Several paintings of the period depict Maharajas and courtiers at the royal courts of Deccan and Mughal India with bidriware articles such as hookahs and boxes. According to Markel, relying on Zebrowski, brass inlay “was confined to the Deccan and generally ceased to be inlaid after 1725”.

The central medallion is composed of four concentric circles of different elements, each defined and framed by a narrow string, or strings, of inlaid wire. At the very centre of the salver is a small circle with brass inlaid in a bold geometric design.  This is surrounded by three bands of decreasing width. First, a silver and brass inlaid elegant stylised floral and foliate design. Next, a simple repeating undulating pattern of silver and brass floral and foliate elements. The outermost and narrowest band of the medallion consists of alternating and repeating silver and brass quatrefoils.  From this point – the outer limit of the central medallion – a lozenge field emanates out and towards the rim in rows of ascending size until they reach the edge of the field, which is banded by the same repeating band of quatrefoils used at the start.

The changes in scale of the narrowing bands around the central medallion, followed by the widening bands of the emanating lozenges shows a great technical ability and dexterity and demonstrate skill and forethought in planning the design.  By playing with the perspective in this way, they have created an optical illusion; so that when the salver is viewed from above, the salver appears to be more curvaceous, rounded and bowl shaped than is actually the case. To the rim is a wide band of silver and brass palmettes, alternating in direction and interspersed with scrolling foliage. The outer edge of the salver is angled and inlaid with brass wire in a repeating chevron design, echoing the brass inlay at the central point.

Markel quotes the writer and Victorian art critic, Owen Jones, impressions of bidri hookahs (huqqas) he had seen in London’s 1851 Crystal Palace or ‘Great’ Exhibition, Jones noted that ‘In the equal distribution of the surface ornament over the grounds, the Indians exhibit an instinct and perfection of drawing perfectly marvellous.”

This salver is in exceptional original condition for its age, exhibiting only minor losses of inlay.  It demonstrates two different inlay techniques and utilises the contrasting effects of the two different metal inlays to great effect. This salver represents all that Jones most admired about Indian design and you would be unlikely to ever find an example of bidriware which would better illustrate his comments.

Provenance:          European art market

Size:                          Diameter:  36 cms

References:

Stephen A Markel, Bidri Ware [in LACMA]: Lyric Patterns

Mark Zebrowski, “Bidri:  Metalware from the Islamic Courts of India”, Art East, 1, 1982, pp. 27-ff

Susan Stronge, 1985. Bidri Ware: Inlaid Metalwork from India. Edition, Victoria & Albert Museum

Owen Jones, The Grammar of Ornament, Bernard Quaritch, London, 1868 pages 78-79

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