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{"id":5592458887318,"title":"Antique Indian Silver Chatelaine Hanger, Temple Style, Trichinopoly (tiruchirappalli), India C. 1880","handle":"antique-indian-silver-chatelaine-hanger-temple-style-trichinopoly-tiruchirappalli-india-c-1880","description":"\u003cp\u003eWithin the collection of London’s V \u0026amp; A Museum, there is a very similar antique Indian silver chatelaine hanger, of similar dimensions, which is known to have been purchased in Trichinopoly, India, between 1880 and 1882.  We believe this chatelaine to be of similar date and made in the same city. \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis very fine silver chatelaine hanger has been been richly ornamented using repousse and chased techniques.  The ornamentation is dense and detailed and it has also been pierced in places. The style of the ornament echoes the art found in Hindu temples and has been influenced by the carved stone figures and reliefs which decorate them.  To the top is a\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eyali\u003c\/em\u003e, a mythical, chimera type creature, which is often depicted in South Indian temples and below the yali is a heart shaped central area of ornament surrounded by a complicated arrangement of stylised fish and birds. To the outer edge, surrounding the lower two thirds, is a border of quatrefoil pierced flowers from which small silver bells hang from rings.  The ornamentation on the example within the V \u0026amp; A collection is in a similar style and the design components have been arranged in a similar manner.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe hanger was made in three principal parts:- the decorative boss, the strap like bent hanger which has been fashioned from a piece of thick silver ,then deeply chased with floral and foliate ornament before being soldered securely to the back of the decorative boss and a plain silver ring, which holds the chains and implements which can be hung from it.  This has also been securely attached and is attached to the reverse of the boss, running through a geometrically shaped piece of silver based on the Platonic solid known as an icosahedron which consists of twenty equilateral triangle faces that meet five to a corner.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe stylistic inspiration for Trichinopoly silverware came from the stone carvings of local temple architecture, particularly those of the huge Sri Ranganatha Swamy temple on the holy islet of Srirangam on the opposite side of the Kaveri River from the Rock of Trichonopoly. Standing on a site of 156 acres, this temple is the most important of those disdicated to Vishnu. It is also the largest temple in India and the largest functioning Hindu temple in the world. Silver objects from Trichinopoly are usually made of a heavy gauge of silver, occasionally gold, and highly decorated with fine detailing.The quality of the material and the craftsmanship is very high. In the early 19th century, the majority of silver items made in Trichinopoly were small portable objects of a personal nature, such as jewellery, small boxes, card cases, tinder tubes and goblets, rather than domestic items.  Most customers would have been male military or East India Company personnel, serving in Trichinopoly alone and without families.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe British East India Company had finally conquered Trichinopoly and made it part of the Madras Presidency in 1801 and it became an important strategic stronghold for the British.   Trichonopoly’s geographical situation gave it an excellent vantage point over the surrounding countryside. In the middle of the town was a rock 300 feet high surmounted by the 7th century pagoda shaped Hindu Ucchi Pillayar temple, dedicated to Ganesh. From the top of the temple there was an uninterrupted view of 40 miles in all directions. The city was extremely well fortified and protected by a four mile long double wall with towers at intervals which encircled the whole city. The outer wall was 18 foot high and fronted by a moat 30 foot wide and 15 foot deep. By the late 19\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ecentury Trichinopoly was the second largest city in the Madras Presidency and the centre of the Indian tobacco industry.  Trichy cheroots were in high demand with millions exported internationally\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn 1853, the Great Southern India Railway Company was formed in England and the GSIR’s first Indian railway line was planned to run from Negapatam to Trichinopoly. The line was completed on 11th March 1862 when the final section, the 35 mile long stretch from Tanjore to Trichinopoly, was officially opened. The coming of the railway brought more traders and later, visitors, to the town. The increased number of people coming to Trichinopoly, increased the number of customers visiting the silver workshops and these new tourists, or short stay customers, required a different selection of objects to the silversmiths previous customers, with jewellery becoming very popular. In addition, the railway provided a safe way for customers to travel with their valuables with minimal time and effort. That said, even post railway, most silver objects still tended to be relatively small in size in comparison with the silverware produced in other Indian silver centres like Madras or Bombay.  Trichinopoly silver is far less common than some of the other Indian regional styles, for example those of Kutch or Lucknow. In 1926, an Indian railway guide stated that ‘‘Trichinopoly is one of the biggest markets in the world for rubies.\" and \"Articles in silver and gold are excellently made by the local gold and silversmiths, who are very successful with their repousse work. The cost of well-made silver articles is usually double the value of their weight in rupees\".\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eProvenance:- \u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eUK art market\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eDimensions:- \u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eHeight 10cms; Width 8cms\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eWeight:- \u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e        88 grammes\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eReferences:-\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eV \u0026amp; A Museum, London, Accession number IS 1870 - 1883\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eSouth Indian Railway Illustrated Guide, Madras 1926\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eS Muthiah, The Railway of the Deep South, The Hindu, 9th May 2010\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-08-10T00:07:45+01:00","created_at":"2020-08-10T00:07:44+01:00","vendor":"Joseph Cohen Antiques","type":"Chatelaine Hanger","tags":["Sold 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the collection of London’s V \u0026amp; A Museum, there is a very similar antique Indian silver chatelaine hanger, of similar dimensions, which is known to have been purchased in Trichinopoly, India, between 1880 and 1882.  We believe this chatelaine to be of similar date and made in the same city. \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis very fine silver chatelaine hanger has been been richly ornamented using repousse and chased techniques.  The ornamentation is dense and detailed and it has also been pierced in places. The style of the ornament echoes the art found in Hindu temples and has been influenced by the carved stone figures and reliefs which decorate them.  To the top is a\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eyali\u003c\/em\u003e, a mythical, chimera type creature, which is often depicted in South Indian temples and below the yali is a heart shaped central area of ornament surrounded by a complicated arrangement of stylised fish and birds. To the outer edge, surrounding the lower two thirds, is a border of quatrefoil pierced flowers from which small silver bells hang from rings.  The ornamentation on the example within the V \u0026amp; A collection is in a similar style and the design components have been arranged in a similar manner.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe hanger was made in three principal parts:- the decorative boss, the strap like bent hanger which has been fashioned from a piece of thick silver ,then deeply chased with floral and foliate ornament before being soldered securely to the back of the decorative boss and a plain silver ring, which holds the chains and implements which can be hung from it.  This has also been securely attached and is attached to the reverse of the boss, running through a geometrically shaped piece of silver based on the Platonic solid known as an icosahedron which consists of twenty equilateral triangle faces that meet five to a corner.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe stylistic inspiration for Trichinopoly silverware came from the stone carvings of local temple architecture, particularly those of the huge Sri Ranganatha Swamy temple on the holy islet of Srirangam on the opposite side of the Kaveri River from the Rock of Trichonopoly. Standing on a site of 156 acres, this temple is the most important of those disdicated to Vishnu. It is also the largest temple in India and the largest functioning Hindu temple in the world. Silver objects from Trichinopoly are usually made of a heavy gauge of silver, occasionally gold, and highly decorated with fine detailing.The quality of the material and the craftsmanship is very high. In the early 19th century, the majority of silver items made in Trichinopoly were small portable objects of a personal nature, such as jewellery, small boxes, card cases, tinder tubes and goblets, rather than domestic items.  Most customers would have been male military or East India Company personnel, serving in Trichinopoly alone and without families.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe British East India Company had finally conquered Trichinopoly and made it part of the Madras Presidency in 1801 and it became an important strategic stronghold for the British.   Trichonopoly’s geographical situation gave it an excellent vantage point over the surrounding countryside. In the middle of the town was a rock 300 feet high surmounted by the 7th century pagoda shaped Hindu Ucchi Pillayar temple, dedicated to Ganesh. From the top of the temple there was an uninterrupted view of 40 miles in all directions. The city was extremely well fortified and protected by a four mile long double wall with towers at intervals which encircled the whole city. The outer wall was 18 foot high and fronted by a moat 30 foot wide and 15 foot deep. By the late 19\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ecentury Trichinopoly was the second largest city in the Madras Presidency and the centre of the Indian tobacco industry.  Trichy cheroots were in high demand with millions exported internationally\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn 1853, the Great Southern India Railway Company was formed in England and the GSIR’s first Indian railway line was planned to run from Negapatam to Trichinopoly. The line was completed on 11th March 1862 when the final section, the 35 mile long stretch from Tanjore to Trichinopoly, was officially opened. The coming of the railway brought more traders and later, visitors, to the town. The increased number of people coming to Trichinopoly, increased the number of customers visiting the silver workshops and these new tourists, or short stay customers, required a different selection of objects to the silversmiths previous customers, with jewellery becoming very popular. In addition, the railway provided a safe way for customers to travel with their valuables with minimal time and effort. That said, even post railway, most silver objects still tended to be relatively small in size in comparison with the silverware produced in other Indian silver centres like Madras or Bombay.  Trichinopoly silver is far less common than some of the other Indian regional styles, for example those of Kutch or Lucknow. In 1926, an Indian railway guide stated that ‘‘Trichinopoly is one of the biggest markets in the world for rubies.\" and \"Articles in silver and gold are excellently made by the local gold and silversmiths, who are very successful with their repousse work. The cost of well-made silver articles is usually double the value of their weight in rupees\".\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eProvenance:- \u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eUK art market\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eDimensions:- \u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eHeight 10cms; Width 8cms\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eWeight:- \u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e        88 grammes\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eReferences:-\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eV \u0026amp; A Museum, London, Accession number IS 1870 - 1883\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eSouth Indian Railway Illustrated Guide, Madras 1926\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eS Muthiah, The Railway of the Deep South, The Hindu, 9th May 2010\u003c\/p\u003e"}

Antique Indian Silver Chatelaine Hanger, Temple Style, Trichinopoly (tiruchirappalli), India C. 1880

Product Description

Within the collection of London’s V & A Museum, there is a very similar antique Indian silver chatelaine hanger, of similar dimensions, which is known to have been purchased in Trichinopoly, India, between 1880 and 1882.  We believe this chatelaine to be of similar date and made in the same city. 

This very fine silver chatelaine hanger has been been richly ornamented using repousse and chased techniques.  The ornamentation is dense and detailed and it has also been pierced in places. The style of the ornament echoes the art found in Hindu temples and has been influenced by the carved stone figures and reliefs which decorate them.  To the top is a yali, a mythical, chimera type creature, which is often depicted in South Indian temples and below the yali is a heart shaped central area of ornament surrounded by a complicated arrangement of stylised fish and birds. To the outer edge, surrounding the lower two thirds, is a border of quatrefoil pierced flowers from which small silver bells hang from rings.  The ornamentation on the example within the V & A collection is in a similar style and the design components have been arranged in a similar manner.

The hanger was made in three principal parts:- the decorative boss, the strap like bent hanger which has been fashioned from a piece of thick silver ,then deeply chased with floral and foliate ornament before being soldered securely to the back of the decorative boss and a plain silver ring, which holds the chains and implements which can be hung from it.  This has also been securely attached and is attached to the reverse of the boss, running through a geometrically shaped piece of silver based on the Platonic solid known as an icosahedron which consists of twenty equilateral triangle faces that meet five to a corner.

The stylistic inspiration for Trichinopoly silverware came from the stone carvings of local temple architecture, particularly those of the huge Sri Ranganatha Swamy temple on the holy islet of Srirangam on the opposite side of the Kaveri River from the Rock of Trichonopoly. Standing on a site of 156 acres, this temple is the most important of those disdicated to Vishnu. It is also the largest temple in India and the largest functioning Hindu temple in the world. Silver objects from Trichinopoly are usually made of a heavy gauge of silver, occasionally gold, and highly decorated with fine detailing.The quality of the material and the craftsmanship is very high. In the early 19th century, the majority of silver items made in Trichinopoly were small portable objects of a personal nature, such as jewellery, small boxes, card cases, tinder tubes and goblets, rather than domestic items.  Most customers would have been male military or East India Company personnel, serving in Trichinopoly alone and without families.

The British East India Company had finally conquered Trichinopoly and made it part of the Madras Presidency in 1801 and it became an important strategic stronghold for the British.   Trichonopoly’s geographical situation gave it an excellent vantage point over the surrounding countryside. In the middle of the town was a rock 300 feet high surmounted by the 7th century pagoda shaped Hindu Ucchi Pillayar temple, dedicated to Ganesh. From the top of the temple there was an uninterrupted view of 40 miles in all directions. The city was extremely well fortified and protected by a four mile long double wall with towers at intervals which encircled the whole city. The outer wall was 18 foot high and fronted by a moat 30 foot wide and 15 foot deep. By the late 19th century Trichinopoly was the second largest city in the Madras Presidency and the centre of the Indian tobacco industry.  Trichy cheroots were in high demand with millions exported internationally

In 1853, the Great Southern India Railway Company was formed in England and the GSIR’s first Indian railway line was planned to run from Negapatam to Trichinopoly. The line was completed on 11th March 1862 when the final section, the 35 mile long stretch from Tanjore to Trichinopoly, was officially opened. The coming of the railway brought more traders and later, visitors, to the town. The increased number of people coming to Trichinopoly, increased the number of customers visiting the silver workshops and these new tourists, or short stay customers, required a different selection of objects to the silversmiths previous customers, with jewellery becoming very popular. In addition, the railway provided a safe way for customers to travel with their valuables with minimal time and effort. That said, even post railway, most silver objects still tended to be relatively small in size in comparison with the silverware produced in other Indian silver centres like Madras or Bombay.  Trichinopoly silver is far less common than some of the other Indian regional styles, for example those of Kutch or Lucknow. In 1926, an Indian railway guide stated that ‘‘Trichinopoly is one of the biggest markets in the world for rubies." and "Articles in silver and gold are excellently made by the local gold and silversmiths, who are very successful with their repousse work. The cost of well-made silver articles is usually double the value of their weight in rupees".

Provenance:-  UK art market

Dimensions:-  Height 10cms; Width 8cms

Weight:-          88 grammes

References:-

V & A Museum, London, Accession number IS 1870 - 1883

South Indian Railway Illustrated Guide, Madras 1926

S Muthiah, The Railway of the Deep South, The Hindu, 9th May 2010

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