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{"id":5591677337750,"title":"Antique Indian Silver Salver (thali), Large Size, India – 18th Century","handle":"antique-indian-silver-salver-thali-large-size-india-18th-century","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis is an exceptionally fine and large example of an Indian shallow bowl or deep plate, sometimes referred to as a\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003ethali\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e(the Indian word for plate) and part of a rare group of similarly shaped and ornamented vessels which are well represented within museums and private collections. Floral ornamentation is common to all examples, particularly elements derived from the lotus flower, with figural representations only occasional.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis thali is approximately 35 cms wide and of circular shape and complex form, with deeply sculptural sides . The metal has been hammered into shape, engraved and decorated in bands of repousse and chasing. A series of foliate and plain bands are arranged concentrically around a finely worked central figural roundel, portraying a goose.   Plain, deep and crisply executed concave niches, reminiscent of the deeply scalloped undersides of the arches and window recesses in The Red Fort (Lal Qila), Old Delhi, lead up from a band of arched floral panels to the finely worked floral rim. The ornamentation has been finely and artistically rendered throughout, giving depth and movement.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eTerlinden illustrates two similar dishes, originating from Central India and the Deccan on page 103, attributing them to the 18\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ecentury or earlier.  Another similar, but substantially smaller example, from the V \u0026amp; A’s collection, is illustrated on page 104.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMany have assumed that these vessels were probably intended for food service and feasting which are well documented in Mughal literature and art.  Sotheby’s suggest Pandan tray, for a similar 18\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ecentury Deccani  thali sold by them in 2004. It is also possible that some, or all, may have had an alternative ritual purpose.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePuja (pooja) is the most popular form of daily worship, or ritual, practiced in Hindu households. The purpose of the ceremony is to create a spiritual connection with the divine. When the spiritual connection with the deity has been established, flowers and water are offered.  The puja ceremony varies in length and complexity but requires a number of decoratively arranged and dedicated articles for its performance, with each object associated with the ritual having its own particular significance. In present day India, a wide shallow bowl known as a ‘puja thali’, is used to hold these articles and the tray is held in both hands whilst the ritual is being performed.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eHamsa, the goose, depicted in the central roundel of this bowl, is the vehicle of Brahma, the Hindu god of creation and according to the Puranas, Brahma was self-born in the lotus flower. Stylistically, this representation of Hamsa is very similar to an 18\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ecentury southern Indian brass figure of Hamsa, sold at auction in 2011 by Matthew Barton Ltd, referenced by examples from Zebrowski.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eWhen the thali is viewed from above, the curved edges of the arched floral panels and of the deep scalloping can be read as the edges of a double row of lotus petals.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eEssentially, Mughal art was a fusion of ancient Indian symbolism with Persian elements and although the decoration is unmistakably Moghul in style, the combination of scrolling floral and bird motifs have their roots in early Indian stone carving, such as the 12\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ecentury friezes in Mukteswara Temple, North Karnataka.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIslamic Art has a long tradition of representing geese swimming in lotus shaped pools (Malecka) predating the Mughal period.  This bowl could also be interpreted as a representation of such a pool or basin.  An example of a lotus shaped pool still existing today is the ancient royal bathing pond at Polonnaruwa, Sri Lanka.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eFollowing this line of thought, the decorative bands would be viewed as the concentric ripples which emanate out from the point where the surface of the water is disturbed and the floral bands as the debris of fallen leaves and petals floating on the water’s surface and being moved by the ripples. The scalloped edges could be interpreted on the one hand, as representing the physical structure of the stone edges and, on the other, as the motion of the wavelets lapping at the edges of the pool.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe representation of architectural motifs in other medium has parallels with earlier Persian textile design. The central medallions of some early mosque carpets are believed to represent the very complex mosaic patterns and geometry of the mosque cupolas beneath which they were intended to lie.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis bowl dates to the 18\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ecentury and probably originates from central India or the Deccan or Tonk in Rajasthan\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eAlthough the initial purpose of these vessels is still the subject of conjecture, this example’s unusually large size and very fine craftsmanship indicate that it would have been made for a prince’s court, very high status household or a temple.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eProvenance:\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e        European art market\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eSize:\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e                        34.5 cms diameter\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eWeight:\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e                  749 grammes\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eReferences:\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eVictoria and Albert Museum, London, museum number, 02687 (IS)\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eSotheby’s, Lot 132, Arts of the Islamic World, 13\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eOctober 2004, London\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMatthew Barton Ltd, Lot 4, Silver, Jewellery, Vertu, Ceramic \u0026amp; Works of Art, 24\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eMay 2011\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMalecka, Anna, University of Warsaw Art History Unit, Solar Symbolism of the Mughal Thrones. A preliminary Note, Arts Asiatiques, 1999, Volume 54, Issue 54, pp. 24-32\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eTerlinden, C., \u003cstrong\u003eMughal Silver Magnificence\u003c\/strong\u003e (XVI-XIX C.), Antalga (Bruxelles), 1987\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eZebrowski, Mark, \u003cstrong\u003eGold, Silver \u0026amp; Bronze from Mughal India\u003c\/strong\u003e, Alexandra Press, London, 1997\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eRoyal Bathing Pond,\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ePolonnaruwa, Sri Lanka\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-08-09T17:00:24+01:00","created_at":"2020-08-09T17:00:22+01:00","vendor":"Joseph Cohen Antiques","type":"Silver Salver","tags":["Sold Archive"],"price":0,"price_min":0,"price_max":0,"available":false,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":35685813911702,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default 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is an exceptionally fine and large example of an Indian shallow bowl or deep plate, sometimes referred to as a\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003ethali\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e(the Indian word for plate) and part of a rare group of similarly shaped and ornamented vessels which are well represented within museums and private collections. Floral ornamentation is common to all examples, particularly elements derived from the lotus flower, with figural representations only occasional.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis thali is approximately 35 cms wide and of circular shape and complex form, with deeply sculptural sides . The metal has been hammered into shape, engraved and decorated in bands of repousse and chasing. A series of foliate and plain bands are arranged concentrically around a finely worked central figural roundel, portraying a goose.   Plain, deep and crisply executed concave niches, reminiscent of the deeply scalloped undersides of the arches and window recesses in The Red Fort (Lal Qila), Old Delhi, lead up from a band of arched floral panels to the finely worked floral rim. The ornamentation has been finely and artistically rendered throughout, giving depth and movement.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eTerlinden illustrates two similar dishes, originating from Central India and the Deccan on page 103, attributing them to the 18\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ecentury or earlier.  Another similar, but substantially smaller example, from the V \u0026amp; A’s collection, is illustrated on page 104.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMany have assumed that these vessels were probably intended for food service and feasting which are well documented in Mughal literature and art.  Sotheby’s suggest Pandan tray, for a similar 18\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ecentury Deccani  thali sold by them in 2004. It is also possible that some, or all, may have had an alternative ritual purpose.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePuja (pooja) is the most popular form of daily worship, or ritual, practiced in Hindu households. The purpose of the ceremony is to create a spiritual connection with the divine. When the spiritual connection with the deity has been established, flowers and water are offered.  The puja ceremony varies in length and complexity but requires a number of decoratively arranged and dedicated articles for its performance, with each object associated with the ritual having its own particular significance. In present day India, a wide shallow bowl known as a ‘puja thali’, is used to hold these articles and the tray is held in both hands whilst the ritual is being performed.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eHamsa, the goose, depicted in the central roundel of this bowl, is the vehicle of Brahma, the Hindu god of creation and according to the Puranas, Brahma was self-born in the lotus flower. Stylistically, this representation of Hamsa is very similar to an 18\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ecentury southern Indian brass figure of Hamsa, sold at auction in 2011 by Matthew Barton Ltd, referenced by examples from Zebrowski.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eWhen the thali is viewed from above, the curved edges of the arched floral panels and of the deep scalloping can be read as the edges of a double row of lotus petals.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eEssentially, Mughal art was a fusion of ancient Indian symbolism with Persian elements and although the decoration is unmistakably Moghul in style, the combination of scrolling floral and bird motifs have their roots in early Indian stone carving, such as the 12\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ecentury friezes in Mukteswara Temple, North Karnataka.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIslamic Art has a long tradition of representing geese swimming in lotus shaped pools (Malecka) predating the Mughal period.  This bowl could also be interpreted as a representation of such a pool or basin.  An example of a lotus shaped pool still existing today is the ancient royal bathing pond at Polonnaruwa, Sri Lanka.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eFollowing this line of thought, the decorative bands would be viewed as the concentric ripples which emanate out from the point where the surface of the water is disturbed and the floral bands as the debris of fallen leaves and petals floating on the water’s surface and being moved by the ripples. The scalloped edges could be interpreted on the one hand, as representing the physical structure of the stone edges and, on the other, as the motion of the wavelets lapping at the edges of the pool.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe representation of architectural motifs in other medium has parallels with earlier Persian textile design. The central medallions of some early mosque carpets are believed to represent the very complex mosaic patterns and geometry of the mosque cupolas beneath which they were intended to lie.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis bowl dates to the 18\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ecentury and probably originates from central India or the Deccan or Tonk in Rajasthan\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eAlthough the initial purpose of these vessels is still the subject of conjecture, this example’s unusually large size and very fine craftsmanship indicate that it would have been made for a prince’s court, very high status household or a temple.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eProvenance:\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e        European art market\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eSize:\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e                        34.5 cms diameter\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eWeight:\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e                  749 grammes\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eReferences:\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eVictoria and Albert Museum, London, museum number, 02687 (IS)\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eSotheby’s, Lot 132, Arts of the Islamic World, 13\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eOctober 2004, London\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMatthew Barton Ltd, Lot 4, Silver, Jewellery, Vertu, Ceramic \u0026amp; Works of Art, 24\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eMay 2011\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMalecka, Anna, University of Warsaw Art History Unit, Solar Symbolism of the Mughal Thrones. A preliminary Note, Arts Asiatiques, 1999, Volume 54, Issue 54, pp. 24-32\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eTerlinden, C., \u003cstrong\u003eMughal Silver Magnificence\u003c\/strong\u003e (XVI-XIX C.), Antalga (Bruxelles), 1987\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eZebrowski, Mark, \u003cstrong\u003eGold, Silver \u0026amp; Bronze from Mughal India\u003c\/strong\u003e, Alexandra Press, London, 1997\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eRoyal Bathing Pond,\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ePolonnaruwa, Sri Lanka\u003c\/p\u003e"}

Antique Indian Silver Salver (thali), Large Size, India – 18th Century

Product Description

This is an exceptionally fine and large example of an Indian shallow bowl or deep plate, sometimes referred to as a thali (the Indian word for plate) and part of a rare group of similarly shaped and ornamented vessels which are well represented within museums and private collections. Floral ornamentation is common to all examples, particularly elements derived from the lotus flower, with figural representations only occasional.

This thali is approximately 35 cms wide and of circular shape and complex form, with deeply sculptural sides . The metal has been hammered into shape, engraved and decorated in bands of repousse and chasing. A series of foliate and plain bands are arranged concentrically around a finely worked central figural roundel, portraying a goose.   Plain, deep and crisply executed concave niches, reminiscent of the deeply scalloped undersides of the arches and window recesses in The Red Fort (Lal Qila), Old Delhi, lead up from a band of arched floral panels to the finely worked floral rim. The ornamentation has been finely and artistically rendered throughout, giving depth and movement.

Terlinden illustrates two similar dishes, originating from Central India and the Deccan on page 103, attributing them to the 18th century or earlier.  Another similar, but substantially smaller example, from the V & A’s collection, is illustrated on page 104.

Many have assumed that these vessels were probably intended for food service and feasting which are well documented in Mughal literature and art.  Sotheby’s suggest Pandan tray, for a similar 18th century Deccani  thali sold by them in 2004. It is also possible that some, or all, may have had an alternative ritual purpose.

Puja (pooja) is the most popular form of daily worship, or ritual, practiced in Hindu households. The purpose of the ceremony is to create a spiritual connection with the divine. When the spiritual connection with the deity has been established, flowers and water are offered.  The puja ceremony varies in length and complexity but requires a number of decoratively arranged and dedicated articles for its performance, with each object associated with the ritual having its own particular significance. In present day India, a wide shallow bowl known as a ‘puja thali’, is used to hold these articles and the tray is held in both hands whilst the ritual is being performed.

Hamsa, the goose, depicted in the central roundel of this bowl, is the vehicle of Brahma, the Hindu god of creation and according to the Puranas, Brahma was self-born in the lotus flower. Stylistically, this representation of Hamsa is very similar to an 18th century southern Indian brass figure of Hamsa, sold at auction in 2011 by Matthew Barton Ltd, referenced by examples from Zebrowski.

When the thali is viewed from above, the curved edges of the arched floral panels and of the deep scalloping can be read as the edges of a double row of lotus petals.

Essentially, Mughal art was a fusion of ancient Indian symbolism with Persian elements and although the decoration is unmistakably Moghul in style, the combination of scrolling floral and bird motifs have their roots in early Indian stone carving, such as the 12th century friezes in Mukteswara Temple, North Karnataka.

Islamic Art has a long tradition of representing geese swimming in lotus shaped pools (Malecka) predating the Mughal period.  This bowl could also be interpreted as a representation of such a pool or basin.  An example of a lotus shaped pool still existing today is the ancient royal bathing pond at Polonnaruwa, Sri Lanka.

Following this line of thought, the decorative bands would be viewed as the concentric ripples which emanate out from the point where the surface of the water is disturbed and the floral bands as the debris of fallen leaves and petals floating on the water’s surface and being moved by the ripples. The scalloped edges could be interpreted on the one hand, as representing the physical structure of the stone edges and, on the other, as the motion of the wavelets lapping at the edges of the pool.

The representation of architectural motifs in other medium has parallels with earlier Persian textile design. The central medallions of some early mosque carpets are believed to represent the very complex mosaic patterns and geometry of the mosque cupolas beneath which they were intended to lie.

This bowl dates to the 18th century and probably originates from central India or the Deccan or Tonk in Rajasthan

Although the initial purpose of these vessels is still the subject of conjecture, this example’s unusually large size and very fine craftsmanship indicate that it would have been made for a prince’s court, very high status household or a temple.

Provenance:        European art market

Size:                        34.5 cms diameter

Weight:                  749 grammes

 

References:

Victoria and Albert Museum, London, museum number, 02687 (IS)

Sotheby’s, Lot 132, Arts of the Islamic World, 13th October 2004, London

Matthew Barton Ltd, Lot 4, Silver, Jewellery, Vertu, Ceramic & Works of Art, 24th May 2011

Malecka, Anna, University of Warsaw Art History Unit, Solar Symbolism of the Mughal Thrones. A preliminary Note, Arts Asiatiques, 1999, Volume 54, Issue 54, pp. 24-32

Terlinden, C., Mughal Silver Magnificence (XVI-XIX C.), Antalga (Bruxelles), 1987

Zebrowski, Mark, Gold, Silver & Bronze from Mughal India, Alexandra Press, London, 1997

Royal Bathing Pond, Polonnaruwa, Sri Lanka

SOLD
Maximum quantity available reached.

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