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{"id":5592424874134,"title":"Antique South East Asian Silver Tea Kettle, Kingdom Of Luang Pabang, (laos) – 1900\/1910","handle":"antique-south-east-asian-silver-tea-kettle-kingdom-of-luang-pabang-laos-1900-1910","description":"\u003cp\u003eThis fine antique silver tea kettle was made in Luang Pabang (sometimes spelt Prabang, Phrabang or Phabang), Laos around 1910. The tea pot has been inscribed in two places in Lao script; around the rim of the cover and across the underside of the base.  On the rim it says ‘Luang Pabang town’ and across the base, ‘Made in Luang Pabang’ *.  \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eLuang Pabang was the capital of a kingdom of the same name until it was annexed by France in 1893. Up until that time, Luang Pabang had been a vassal state of Siam, modern day Thailand, and the ornamentation of this kettle shows the influence of the Siamese artistic tradition. The French recognised Luang Pabang as the royal residence of the region and eventually, the ruler of Luang Prabang became synonymous with the figurehead of Laos.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn 1995, just over 100 years later, Luang Pabang was listed as a Unesco World Heritage Site for its unique and remarkably well preserved architectural, artistic, religious and cultural heritage. It is likely that the silversmith who made this kettle was primarily employed in supplying the King and his courtiers.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis kettle belonged to a French diplomat, Monsieur Aimé Grande, who served in Luang Pabang and Cambodia when those countries formed part of the French Colonies in Indo-China.  Mr Grande served in Luang Pabang and later in Phnomh Penh, Cambodia as civil service adminstrator and resident mayor of the town.  He was decorated by the ruler of Laos, receiving the Order of Millions of Elephants and the Order of the White Parasol.   In Cambodia, he received the Royal Order of Merit and on 14\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eJuly 1914, King Sisowath presented him with the medal of Commander of the Royal Order of Merit.  Please refer to our last photograph which shows Monsieur Grande, wearing a black jacket, standing behind and to the right of King Sisowath, who is seated. The building in the background was the French Residence in Pnomh Penh and other members of the Residence’s staff are also in the photo.  Monsieur Grande is known to have left Pnomh Penh and returned permanently to France in 1917, bringing his possessions, including this kettle, home with him. After his death, his effects were kept by family members. \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe kettle has an ornamented lift off cover with a circular knob and a tall scrolling swing handle with an ornamented silver grip.  The entire surface of the body of the kettle has been ornamented, except for the short neck, which is of plain silver. The spout is also of plain silver, save for the ferocious open mouthed dragon’s head which surrounds the spout at its base and travels part way up the spout.  This rather charming design feature, which suggests that the hot tea emanates from the mouth of a dragon, can also be found in Chinese silver tea pots and kettles, particularly those made by Tu Mao Xing, around a similar date.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe ornamentation on this kettle has great charm and was executed with great confidence; showing vitality and exuberance. Stylised zig-zag borders encircle the lowest part of the body and surround the base of the neck. The same motif has been applied to the sides of the cover.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe principal scene to the body of the tea pot is very deep and shows a continuous panoramic scene of hunters in a jungle setting.  The depiction is very atmospheric; the vegetation is lush and the trees tower high above the hunters. There are many flowers within the dense vegetation.  In the undergrowth and up in the canopy, a variety of birds and small animals are semi-concealed, observing the humans’ activity below. \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eA hunter, armed with a rifle, is taking aim at a deer and the deer has turned his head backwards to look at his assailant.  This scene indicates the arrival of ‘modern’ hunting practices, which were introduced by Europeans. The other hunting scenes show more ancient and traditional hunting methods. Two hunters are crouching in the undergrowth as they set a cordage snare; another hunter has climbed a tree and is trying to spear a small elephant from above with a forked spear while his partner waits at a distance with his spear readied and a lone hunter, armed with a spear, is tracking a small bear.  It is likely that at the date this kettle was made, a few years after Luang Pabang had become a French Protectorate, the two types of hunting were both in use.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe underside of the base shows the imprints of the hand hammering which was the method used to create this kettle.  This kettle would have been fashioned entirely by hand, with only simple hand tools and without the benefit of mechanisation.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eTwo silver kettles of very similar form, made by Chinese silversmiths, are illustrated in ‘Chinese Export Silver 1785-1940, The Definitive Collectors’ Guide’. They appear under the entry for ‘Da Xing’.  The first, made by Da Xing, probably for the Chinese Straits market, and the second, made by Hui Yuan, a Chinese silversmith operating in Siam (Thailand).  The form of all three kettles is near identical save that this kettle was made with a silver grip to the centre of the handle whilst the other two have ivory grips with applied silver ornament.  All three kettles are richly ornamented, and together they testify to the popularity of this style of kettle across South East Asia around 1900\/1910. \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIt is very seldom that we come across examples of antique silverware from Luang Pabang and this teapot, which is over 100 years old, is a rare piece and in excellent condition. Furthermore, the place of manufacture is inscribed to the kettle and to the lid, and the provenance is excellent.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eProvenance:-\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e European art market from the family of Monsieur Grande by descent\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eDimensions:-\u003c\/em\u003e  Height, 19 cms, Width 16.5 cms\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eWeight:-\u003c\/em\u003e   758 grammes\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eReferences:-\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e* With grateful thanks to Martin Platt for his assistance with this translation\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eAdrien von Ferscht, Chinese Export Silver 1785-1940 The Definitive Collectors’ Guide, 4th Edition @chinese-export-silver.com\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-08-09T23:39:28+01:00","created_at":"2020-08-09T23:39:25+01:00","vendor":"Joseph Cohen Antiques","type":"Tea Kettle","tags":["Sold 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fine antique silver tea kettle was made in Luang Pabang (sometimes spelt Prabang, Phrabang or Phabang), Laos around 1910. The tea pot has been inscribed in two places in Lao script; around the rim of the cover and across the underside of the base.  On the rim it says ‘Luang Pabang town’ and across the base, ‘Made in Luang Pabang’ *.  \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eLuang Pabang was the capital of a kingdom of the same name until it was annexed by France in 1893. Up until that time, Luang Pabang had been a vassal state of Siam, modern day Thailand, and the ornamentation of this kettle shows the influence of the Siamese artistic tradition. The French recognised Luang Pabang as the royal residence of the region and eventually, the ruler of Luang Prabang became synonymous with the figurehead of Laos.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn 1995, just over 100 years later, Luang Pabang was listed as a Unesco World Heritage Site for its unique and remarkably well preserved architectural, artistic, religious and cultural heritage. It is likely that the silversmith who made this kettle was primarily employed in supplying the King and his courtiers.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis kettle belonged to a French diplomat, Monsieur Aimé Grande, who served in Luang Pabang and Cambodia when those countries formed part of the French Colonies in Indo-China.  Mr Grande served in Luang Pabang and later in Phnomh Penh, Cambodia as civil service adminstrator and resident mayor of the town.  He was decorated by the ruler of Laos, receiving the Order of Millions of Elephants and the Order of the White Parasol.   In Cambodia, he received the Royal Order of Merit and on 14\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eJuly 1914, King Sisowath presented him with the medal of Commander of the Royal Order of Merit.  Please refer to our last photograph which shows Monsieur Grande, wearing a black jacket, standing behind and to the right of King Sisowath, who is seated. The building in the background was the French Residence in Pnomh Penh and other members of the Residence’s staff are also in the photo.  Monsieur Grande is known to have left Pnomh Penh and returned permanently to France in 1917, bringing his possessions, including this kettle, home with him. After his death, his effects were kept by family members. \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe kettle has an ornamented lift off cover with a circular knob and a tall scrolling swing handle with an ornamented silver grip.  The entire surface of the body of the kettle has been ornamented, except for the short neck, which is of plain silver. The spout is also of plain silver, save for the ferocious open mouthed dragon’s head which surrounds the spout at its base and travels part way up the spout.  This rather charming design feature, which suggests that the hot tea emanates from the mouth of a dragon, can also be found in Chinese silver tea pots and kettles, particularly those made by Tu Mao Xing, around a similar date.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe ornamentation on this kettle has great charm and was executed with great confidence; showing vitality and exuberance. Stylised zig-zag borders encircle the lowest part of the body and surround the base of the neck. The same motif has been applied to the sides of the cover.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe principal scene to the body of the tea pot is very deep and shows a continuous panoramic scene of hunters in a jungle setting.  The depiction is very atmospheric; the vegetation is lush and the trees tower high above the hunters. There are many flowers within the dense vegetation.  In the undergrowth and up in the canopy, a variety of birds and small animals are semi-concealed, observing the humans’ activity below. \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eA hunter, armed with a rifle, is taking aim at a deer and the deer has turned his head backwards to look at his assailant.  This scene indicates the arrival of ‘modern’ hunting practices, which were introduced by Europeans. The other hunting scenes show more ancient and traditional hunting methods. Two hunters are crouching in the undergrowth as they set a cordage snare; another hunter has climbed a tree and is trying to spear a small elephant from above with a forked spear while his partner waits at a distance with his spear readied and a lone hunter, armed with a spear, is tracking a small bear.  It is likely that at the date this kettle was made, a few years after Luang Pabang had become a French Protectorate, the two types of hunting were both in use.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe underside of the base shows the imprints of the hand hammering which was the method used to create this kettle.  This kettle would have been fashioned entirely by hand, with only simple hand tools and without the benefit of mechanisation.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eTwo silver kettles of very similar form, made by Chinese silversmiths, are illustrated in ‘Chinese Export Silver 1785-1940, The Definitive Collectors’ Guide’. They appear under the entry for ‘Da Xing’.  The first, made by Da Xing, probably for the Chinese Straits market, and the second, made by Hui Yuan, a Chinese silversmith operating in Siam (Thailand).  The form of all three kettles is near identical save that this kettle was made with a silver grip to the centre of the handle whilst the other two have ivory grips with applied silver ornament.  All three kettles are richly ornamented, and together they testify to the popularity of this style of kettle across South East Asia around 1900\/1910. \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIt is very seldom that we come across examples of antique silverware from Luang Pabang and this teapot, which is over 100 years old, is a rare piece and in excellent condition. Furthermore, the place of manufacture is inscribed to the kettle and to the lid, and the provenance is excellent.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eProvenance:-\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e European art market from the family of Monsieur Grande by descent\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eDimensions:-\u003c\/em\u003e  Height, 19 cms, Width 16.5 cms\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eWeight:-\u003c\/em\u003e   758 grammes\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eReferences:-\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e* With grateful thanks to Martin Platt for his assistance with this translation\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eAdrien von Ferscht, Chinese Export Silver 1785-1940 The Definitive Collectors’ Guide, 4th Edition @chinese-export-silver.com\u003c\/p\u003e"}

Antique South East Asian Silver Tea Kettle, Kingdom Of Luang Pabang, (laos) – 1900/1910

Product Description

This fine antique silver tea kettle was made in Luang Pabang (sometimes spelt Prabang, Phrabang or Phabang), Laos around 1910. The tea pot has been inscribed in two places in Lao script; around the rim of the cover and across the underside of the base.  On the rim it says ‘Luang Pabang town’ and across the base, ‘Made in Luang Pabang’ *.  

Luang Pabang was the capital of a kingdom of the same name until it was annexed by France in 1893. Up until that time, Luang Pabang had been a vassal state of Siam, modern day Thailand, and the ornamentation of this kettle shows the influence of the Siamese artistic tradition. The French recognised Luang Pabang as the royal residence of the region and eventually, the ruler of Luang Prabang became synonymous with the figurehead of Laos.

In 1995, just over 100 years later, Luang Pabang was listed as a Unesco World Heritage Site for its unique and remarkably well preserved architectural, artistic, religious and cultural heritage. It is likely that the silversmith who made this kettle was primarily employed in supplying the King and his courtiers.

This kettle belonged to a French diplomat, Monsieur Aimé Grande, who served in Luang Pabang and Cambodia when those countries formed part of the French Colonies in Indo-China.  Mr Grande served in Luang Pabang and later in Phnomh Penh, Cambodia as civil service adminstrator and resident mayor of the town.  He was decorated by the ruler of Laos, receiving the Order of Millions of Elephants and the Order of the White Parasol.   In Cambodia, he received the Royal Order of Merit and on 14th July 1914, King Sisowath presented him with the medal of Commander of the Royal Order of Merit.  Please refer to our last photograph which shows Monsieur Grande, wearing a black jacket, standing behind and to the right of King Sisowath, who is seated. The building in the background was the French Residence in Pnomh Penh and other members of the Residence’s staff are also in the photo.  Monsieur Grande is known to have left Pnomh Penh and returned permanently to France in 1917, bringing his possessions, including this kettle, home with him. After his death, his effects were kept by family members. 

The kettle has an ornamented lift off cover with a circular knob and a tall scrolling swing handle with an ornamented silver grip.  The entire surface of the body of the kettle has been ornamented, except for the short neck, which is of plain silver. The spout is also of plain silver, save for the ferocious open mouthed dragon’s head which surrounds the spout at its base and travels part way up the spout.  This rather charming design feature, which suggests that the hot tea emanates from the mouth of a dragon, can also be found in Chinese silver tea pots and kettles, particularly those made by Tu Mao Xing, around a similar date.

The ornamentation on this kettle has great charm and was executed with great confidence; showing vitality and exuberance. Stylised zig-zag borders encircle the lowest part of the body and surround the base of the neck. The same motif has been applied to the sides of the cover.

The principal scene to the body of the tea pot is very deep and shows a continuous panoramic scene of hunters in a jungle setting.  The depiction is very atmospheric; the vegetation is lush and the trees tower high above the hunters. There are many flowers within the dense vegetation.  In the undergrowth and up in the canopy, a variety of birds and small animals are semi-concealed, observing the humans’ activity below. 

A hunter, armed with a rifle, is taking aim at a deer and the deer has turned his head backwards to look at his assailant.  This scene indicates the arrival of ‘modern’ hunting practices, which were introduced by Europeans. The other hunting scenes show more ancient and traditional hunting methods. Two hunters are crouching in the undergrowth as they set a cordage snare; another hunter has climbed a tree and is trying to spear a small elephant from above with a forked spear while his partner waits at a distance with his spear readied and a lone hunter, armed with a spear, is tracking a small bear.  It is likely that at the date this kettle was made, a few years after Luang Pabang had become a French Protectorate, the two types of hunting were both in use.

The underside of the base shows the imprints of the hand hammering which was the method used to create this kettle.  This kettle would have been fashioned entirely by hand, with only simple hand tools and without the benefit of mechanisation.

Two silver kettles of very similar form, made by Chinese silversmiths, are illustrated in ‘Chinese Export Silver 1785-1940, The Definitive Collectors’ Guide’. They appear under the entry for ‘Da Xing’.  The first, made by Da Xing, probably for the Chinese Straits market, and the second, made by Hui Yuan, a Chinese silversmith operating in Siam (Thailand).  The form of all three kettles is near identical save that this kettle was made with a silver grip to the centre of the handle whilst the other two have ivory grips with applied silver ornament.  All three kettles are richly ornamented, and together they testify to the popularity of this style of kettle across South East Asia around 1900/1910. 

It is very seldom that we come across examples of antique silverware from Luang Pabang and this teapot, which is over 100 years old, is a rare piece and in excellent condition. Furthermore, the place of manufacture is inscribed to the kettle and to the lid, and the provenance is excellent.

Provenance:-  European art market from the family of Monsieur Grande by descent

Dimensions:-  Height, 19 cms, Width 16.5 cms

Weight:-   758 grammes

References:-

* With grateful thanks to Martin Platt for his assistance with this translation

Adrien von Ferscht, Chinese Export Silver 1785-1940 The Definitive Collectors’ Guide, 4th Edition @chinese-export-silver.com

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