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{"id":5591752310934,"title":"From The Estate Of The Last Maharaja (maharana) Of Rajpipla, Horse Racing \u0026 Military Interest","handle":"from-the-estate-of-the-last-maharaja-maharana-of-rajpipla-horse-racing-military-interest","description":"\u003cp\u003eThese five very personal and exceedingly glamorous objects are so evocative of the 1920s and 30s, the so-called ‘Golden Age of the Maharajas’.  They once belonged to Sir Vijaysinhji, the last Maharaja of Rajpipla and the 36\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eand last ruler of the 600 year old Gohil Rajput dynasty. \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe collection comprises:-\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eA circular silver-gilt and celestial blue guilloche enamel box with an internal mirror. The cover, with an inlaid gold initial ‘V’, with gold crown above. The box is complete with its original Mappin and Webb case.  \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eA fine rectangular silver-gilt gold and ultramarine blue guilloche enamel book match case, inscribed with the legend ‘\u003cem\u003eWindsor Lad’ Derby 1934\u003c\/em\u003e  (please see below for further information concerning this inscription).\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe top face inlaid with a gold letter ‘V’ within an oval cartouche, surmounted by a gold crown.  Hallmarked for Mappin and Webb, Birmingham 1912.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eA platinum and diamond tie pin by Mappin and Webb. The diamond studded initial ‘V’, within a plain oval cartouche, surmounted by a diamond studded crown and complete with its original case. \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eA gold, diamond and enamel military cap badge bearing the insignia of the 16\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eLight Cavalry Regiment.  The cap badge is complete with its original case bearing the name of retailer, Mappin and Webb, Bombay and London.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe largest item in the collection is a silver and enamel cigarette case featuring a sepia picture of the Maharaja in Indian court dress.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eAffectionately known as ‘Mr Pip’, the Maharaja, was born on 30th January 1890 at Chhatravilas Palace, Nandod (New Rajpipla) and educated at Rajkumar College, Rajkot where he became head boy in 1908.  He received a knighthood (Knight Commander Star of India) on 1st January 1925 and GBE (Knight Grand Cross) on 1st January 1945.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe Prince succeeded to the throne upon the sudden death of his father, Maharaja Chhatrasinhji, in 1915.  He is described as being small, dark, handsome and exceedingly charming with a generous and kindly spirit. He was a benevolent ruler who was a markedly forward thinking social reformer and he worked tirelessly to improve the lives of his people, modernise the state of Rajpipla and further its development. He became one of the leading members of the ‘Chamber of Princes’ until the principality of Rajpipla merged with the Indian Union in 1948.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe Maharaja served in the Imperial Cadet Corps at Dehra Dun as a youth.  On 14th October 1919, he became an Honorary Captain in the Indian Army with the 27\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eLight Cavalry, which became 16\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eLight Cavalry after 1922.  After several promotions, he rose to the rank of Honorary Lt. Colonel on 10th September 1943.  Prior to Indian Independence, the 16\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eLight Cavalry was a regular cavalry regiment of the British Indian Army. \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eFrom an early age, the prince showed great sporting ability.  He was an accomplished rider and marksman and horse racing was his great passion.  Later in life, the Rajpipla royal family fielded its own polo team, comprising Maharaja Vijaysinhji and three of his sons. However, he is perhaps best remembered for being one of India’s most successful racehorse owners, boasting a large stable of horses, his greatest feat was in winning three of the world’s greatest and most prestigious horse races; the Indian, Irish and English Derby races.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis success started when his horse ‘Tipster’ won the inaugural Indian Derby race, held in Calcutta in 1919.  A few years later, in 1926, another of his horses, ‘Embargo’, won the Irish Derby at the Curragh and on the 7\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eJune 1934, after a very thrilling race, ‘Windsor Lad’ won the Epsom Derby, completing the hat trick for him.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn the 1920s and 30s, wealthy and glamorous Indian royals were the celebrities of the day and people were fascinated by their exoticism and high profile, often extravagant, lifestyles. Mr Pip was very comfortable socialising amongst the English aristocracy and became friends with members of the British royal family, movie stars, European aristocrats and the novelist, Ian Fleming, creator of James Bond. The Maharaja’s fourth wife was English socialite, Ella Atherton, who took the Hindu name of Maharini Ella Devi Sahiba.  The couple had two children, Prince Rajsingh and Princess Premila.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMr Pip liked to spend the summers in England, where he owned a small estate and large 25 roomed property in Old Windsor, called ‘The Manor’.  Frequent parties were held there with lavish celebrations following his 1934 Derby win.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe Maharaja signed the instrument of accession to the Dominion of India on 15\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eAugust 1947, which merged Rajpipla State into the Bombay Presidency on 10\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eJune 1948.  Somewhat disillusioned and saddened by the loss of Rajpipla, he left India and returned to England, taking up permanent residence at his home in Windsor until his death in 1951.  A bronze statue of Maharaja Vijaysinhji on horseback still adorns the main square of Rajpipla town.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePlease note; some objects have now been sold, a couple of items are still available for purchase!\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eProvenance:\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e       Purchased within the UK from the Maharaja’s descendants\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eReferences:       \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cem\u003eIndra Vikram Singh, ‘A Maharaja’s Turf’, 2011, Sporting Links, India\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-08-09T17:24:00+01:00","created_at":"2020-08-09T17:23:59+01:00","vendor":"Joseph Cohen Antiques","type":"Golden Age of the Maharajas","tags":["Sold Archive"],"price":0,"price_min":0,"price_max":0,"available":false,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":35686091325590,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":false,"name":"From The Estate Of The Last Maharaja (maharana) Of Rajpipla, Horse Racing \u0026 Military Interest","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":0,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":"shopify","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/GBMZ_Maharajafullset.jpg?v=1596990242"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/GBMZ_Maharajafullset.jpg?v=1596990242","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":10618680836246,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":4025,"width":4025,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/GBMZ_Maharajafullset.jpg?v=1596990242"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":4025,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0124\/1507\/4394\/products\/GBMZ_Maharajafullset.jpg?v=1596990242","width":4025}],"content":"\u003cp\u003eThese five very personal and exceedingly glamorous objects are so evocative of the 1920s and 30s, the so-called ‘Golden Age of the Maharajas’.  They once belonged to Sir Vijaysinhji, the last Maharaja of Rajpipla and the 36\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eand last ruler of the 600 year old Gohil Rajput dynasty. \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe collection comprises:-\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eA circular silver-gilt and celestial blue guilloche enamel box with an internal mirror. The cover, with an inlaid gold initial ‘V’, with gold crown above. The box is complete with its original Mappin and Webb case.  \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eA fine rectangular silver-gilt gold and ultramarine blue guilloche enamel book match case, inscribed with the legend ‘\u003cem\u003eWindsor Lad’ Derby 1934\u003c\/em\u003e  (please see below for further information concerning this inscription).\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe top face inlaid with a gold letter ‘V’ within an oval cartouche, surmounted by a gold crown.  Hallmarked for Mappin and Webb, Birmingham 1912.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eA platinum and diamond tie pin by Mappin and Webb. The diamond studded initial ‘V’, within a plain oval cartouche, surmounted by a diamond studded crown and complete with its original case. \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eA gold, diamond and enamel military cap badge bearing the insignia of the 16\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eLight Cavalry Regiment.  The cap badge is complete with its original case bearing the name of retailer, Mappin and Webb, Bombay and London.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe largest item in the collection is a silver and enamel cigarette case featuring a sepia picture of the Maharaja in Indian court dress.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eAffectionately known as ‘Mr Pip’, the Maharaja, was born on 30th January 1890 at Chhatravilas Palace, Nandod (New Rajpipla) and educated at Rajkumar College, Rajkot where he became head boy in 1908.  He received a knighthood (Knight Commander Star of India) on 1st January 1925 and GBE (Knight Grand Cross) on 1st January 1945.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe Prince succeeded to the throne upon the sudden death of his father, Maharaja Chhatrasinhji, in 1915.  He is described as being small, dark, handsome and exceedingly charming with a generous and kindly spirit. He was a benevolent ruler who was a markedly forward thinking social reformer and he worked tirelessly to improve the lives of his people, modernise the state of Rajpipla and further its development. He became one of the leading members of the ‘Chamber of Princes’ until the principality of Rajpipla merged with the Indian Union in 1948.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe Maharaja served in the Imperial Cadet Corps at Dehra Dun as a youth.  On 14th October 1919, he became an Honorary Captain in the Indian Army with the 27\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eLight Cavalry, which became 16\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eLight Cavalry after 1922.  After several promotions, he rose to the rank of Honorary Lt. Colonel on 10th September 1943.  Prior to Indian Independence, the 16\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eLight Cavalry was a regular cavalry regiment of the British Indian Army. \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eFrom an early age, the prince showed great sporting ability.  He was an accomplished rider and marksman and horse racing was his great passion.  Later in life, the Rajpipla royal family fielded its own polo team, comprising Maharaja Vijaysinhji and three of his sons. However, he is perhaps best remembered for being one of India’s most successful racehorse owners, boasting a large stable of horses, his greatest feat was in winning three of the world’s greatest and most prestigious horse races; the Indian, Irish and English Derby races.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThis success started when his horse ‘Tipster’ won the inaugural Indian Derby race, held in Calcutta in 1919.  A few years later, in 1926, another of his horses, ‘Embargo’, won the Irish Derby at the Curragh and on the 7\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eJune 1934, after a very thrilling race, ‘Windsor Lad’ won the Epsom Derby, completing the hat trick for him.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn the 1920s and 30s, wealthy and glamorous Indian royals were the celebrities of the day and people were fascinated by their exoticism and high profile, often extravagant, lifestyles. Mr Pip was very comfortable socialising amongst the English aristocracy and became friends with members of the British royal family, movie stars, European aristocrats and the novelist, Ian Fleming, creator of James Bond. The Maharaja’s fourth wife was English socialite, Ella Atherton, who took the Hindu name of Maharini Ella Devi Sahiba.  The couple had two children, Prince Rajsingh and Princess Premila.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMr Pip liked to spend the summers in England, where he owned a small estate and large 25 roomed property in Old Windsor, called ‘The Manor’.  Frequent parties were held there with lavish celebrations following his 1934 Derby win.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe Maharaja signed the instrument of accession to the Dominion of India on 15\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eAugust 1947, which merged Rajpipla State into the Bombay Presidency on 10\u003csup\u003eth\u003c\/sup\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eJune 1948.  Somewhat disillusioned and saddened by the loss of Rajpipla, he left India and returned to England, taking up permanent residence at his home in Windsor until his death in 1951.  A bronze statue of Maharaja Vijaysinhji on horseback still adorns the main square of Rajpipla town.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePlease note; some objects have now been sold, a couple of items are still available for purchase!\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eProvenance:\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e       Purchased within the UK from the Maharaja’s descendants\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eReferences:       \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cem\u003eIndra Vikram Singh, ‘A Maharaja’s Turf’, 2011, Sporting Links, India\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}

From The Estate Of The Last Maharaja (maharana) Of Rajpipla, Horse Racing & Military Interest

Product Description

These five very personal and exceedingly glamorous objects are so evocative of the 1920s and 30s, the so-called ‘Golden Age of the Maharajas’.  They once belonged to Sir Vijaysinhji, the last Maharaja of Rajpipla and the 36th and last ruler of the 600 year old Gohil Rajput dynasty. 

The collection comprises:-

A circular silver-gilt and celestial blue guilloche enamel box with an internal mirror. The cover, with an inlaid gold initial ‘V’, with gold crown above. The box is complete with its original Mappin and Webb case.  

A fine rectangular silver-gilt gold and ultramarine blue guilloche enamel book match case, inscribed with the legend ‘Windsor Lad’ Derby 1934  (please see below for further information concerning this inscription).

The top face inlaid with a gold letter ‘V’ within an oval cartouche, surmounted by a gold crown.  Hallmarked for Mappin and Webb, Birmingham 1912.

A platinum and diamond tie pin by Mappin and Webb. The diamond studded initial ‘V’, within a plain oval cartouche, surmounted by a diamond studded crown and complete with its original case. 

A gold, diamond and enamel military cap badge bearing the insignia of the 16th Light Cavalry Regiment.  The cap badge is complete with its original case bearing the name of retailer, Mappin and Webb, Bombay and London.

The largest item in the collection is a silver and enamel cigarette case featuring a sepia picture of the Maharaja in Indian court dress.

Affectionately known as ‘Mr Pip’, the Maharaja, was born on 30th January 1890 at Chhatravilas Palace, Nandod (New Rajpipla) and educated at Rajkumar College, Rajkot where he became head boy in 1908.  He received a knighthood (Knight Commander Star of India) on 1st January 1925 and GBE (Knight Grand Cross) on 1st January 1945.

The Prince succeeded to the throne upon the sudden death of his father, Maharaja Chhatrasinhji, in 1915.  He is described as being small, dark, handsome and exceedingly charming with a generous and kindly spirit. He was a benevolent ruler who was a markedly forward thinking social reformer and he worked tirelessly to improve the lives of his people, modernise the state of Rajpipla and further its development. He became one of the leading members of the ‘Chamber of Princes’ until the principality of Rajpipla merged with the Indian Union in 1948.

The Maharaja served in the Imperial Cadet Corps at Dehra Dun as a youth.  On 14th October 1919, he became an Honorary Captain in the Indian Army with the 27th Light Cavalry, which became 16th Light Cavalry after 1922.  After several promotions, he rose to the rank of Honorary Lt. Colonel on 10th September 1943.  Prior to Indian Independence, the 16th Light Cavalry was a regular cavalry regiment of the British Indian Army. 

From an early age, the prince showed great sporting ability.  He was an accomplished rider and marksman and horse racing was his great passion.  Later in life, the Rajpipla royal family fielded its own polo team, comprising Maharaja Vijaysinhji and three of his sons. However, he is perhaps best remembered for being one of India’s most successful racehorse owners, boasting a large stable of horses, his greatest feat was in winning three of the world’s greatest and most prestigious horse races; the Indian, Irish and English Derby races.

This success started when his horse ‘Tipster’ won the inaugural Indian Derby race, held in Calcutta in 1919.  A few years later, in 1926, another of his horses, ‘Embargo’, won the Irish Derby at the Curragh and on the 7th June 1934, after a very thrilling race, ‘Windsor Lad’ won the Epsom Derby, completing the hat trick for him.

In the 1920s and 30s, wealthy and glamorous Indian royals were the celebrities of the day and people were fascinated by their exoticism and high profile, often extravagant, lifestyles. Mr Pip was very comfortable socialising amongst the English aristocracy and became friends with members of the British royal family, movie stars, European aristocrats and the novelist, Ian Fleming, creator of James Bond. The Maharaja’s fourth wife was English socialite, Ella Atherton, who took the Hindu name of Maharini Ella Devi Sahiba.  The couple had two children, Prince Rajsingh and Princess Premila.

Mr Pip liked to spend the summers in England, where he owned a small estate and large 25 roomed property in Old Windsor, called ‘The Manor’.  Frequent parties were held there with lavish celebrations following his 1934 Derby win.

The Maharaja signed the instrument of accession to the Dominion of India on 15th August 1947, which merged Rajpipla State into the Bombay Presidency on 10th June 1948.  Somewhat disillusioned and saddened by the loss of Rajpipla, he left India and returned to England, taking up permanent residence at his home in Windsor until his death in 1951.  A bronze statue of Maharaja Vijaysinhji on horseback still adorns the main square of Rajpipla town.

Please note; some objects have now been sold, a couple of items are still available for purchase!

Provenance:       Purchased within the UK from the Maharaja’s descendants

 References:       Indra Vikram Singh, ‘A Maharaja’s Turf’, 2011, Sporting Links, India

SOLD
Maximum quantity available reached.

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